So, what IS a traumatic brain injury?

From the Brain Injury Association of America’s website (http://www.biausa.org/aboutbi.htm)

A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as a blow or jolt to the head or a penetrating head injury that disrupts the function of the brain. Not all blows or jolts to the head result in a TBI. The severity of such an injury may range from “mild,” i.e., a brief change in mental status or consciousness to “severe,” i.e., an extended period of unconsciousness or amnesia after the injury. A TBI can result in short or long-term problems with independent function.

The blow or jolt can come from a fall, a car accident, an assault, or a sports injury, and to put things differently from what’s shown above, one person’s life-altering jolt is another person’s insignificant bump. The effects of a blow or jolt depend on the individual, and an impact that may not affect one person that intensely may completely disrupt the life of another person. It’s all very individual, and assessing the damage and addressing it is still a somewhat imprecise science.

The Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 8(3), 86-87. defines a patient with mild traumatic brain injury as:

[S]omeone who has had a traumatically induced physiological disruption of brain function as manifested by at least one of the following:

  1. any period of loss of consciousness;
  2. any loss of memory for events immediately before or after the accident;
  3. any alteration in mental state at the time of the accident (e.g., feeling dazed, disoriented, or confused);
  4. focal neurological deficit(s) that may or may not be transient but where the severity of the injury does not exceed the following:

a. loss of consciousness of approximately 30 minutes or less;
b. after 30 minutes, an initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of 13-15; and
c. posttraumatic amnesia (PTA) not greater than 24 hours.

So, if you’re like me, and you had a blow to your head that caused you to lose consciousness for less than 30 minutes… or even if you were “just” foggy and disoriented and confused after the impact, you may have sustained a mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI).

Just because the injury was mild, doesn’t mean the after-effects are, however. A seemingly insignificant blow to the head can turn your life upside-down and keep you from living fully, year after year, after year. And if the nature of your problems and the severity of them is never fully assessed or understood, the effects can be personally, socially, financially, and spiritual devastating.

Part of the problem with mild TBI, in particular, is that the effects can be largely emotional and behavioral (and thus social) in nature, so they can be interpreted as being “emotional problems” or “mal-adjustment” rather than a legitimate physiological problem. And so the issues can go unaddressed and minimized by folks around the TBI survivor, while the survivor suffers in silence and soldiers on valiantly in isolation, swimming in a sea of mis-information that tells them there’s something wrong with their character, their intelligence, their spirit… when it’s really their physical brain that’s having the issues.

The emotional fallout can be crippling. Living your life alone, isolated, feeling defective, and not knowing why… it all takes a toll. Being unable to sustain meaningful interpersonal relationships because of demons with no names and no faces… unable to hold down work for extended periods of time because of limitations you cannot identify or address… locked away in darkness and silence because people do not know the nature of your difficulties, and the part of you that would normally be able to identify what’s wrong is the very part of you that’s injured… the constant drip-drip-drip of erosive confusion and mounting insecurity and self-doubt undercuts your ability to function in profound and seemingly irreversible ways, turning you into a shell of what you once were. For no apparent reason.

It makes me wonder how many people are living marginal lives, unable to live up to their full potential, because of undiagnosed TBI. I know I have been. And I know I’m not alone.

Technorati Tags: brain damage Brain Injury cognitive-behavioral issues Emotional Fallout Head Trauma journal Mild Traumatic Brain Injury military mtbi Neurology neuropsychology Personal Experiences with TBI psychology psychotherapy rehabilitation Social Issues tbi tbi survivor TBI Symptoms testimony traumatic brain injury veterans

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Author: brokenbrilliant

I am a long-term multiple (mild) Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI or TBI) survivor who experienced assaults, falls, car accidents, sports-related injuries in the 1960s, '70s, '80s, and '90s. My last mild TBI was in 2004, but it was definitely the worst of the lot. I never received medical treatment for my injuries, some of which were sports injuries (and you have to get back in the game!), but I have been living very successfully with cognitive/behavioral (social, emotional, functional) symptoms and complications since I was a young kid. I’ve done it so well, in fact, that virtually nobody knows that I sustained those injuries… and the folks who do know, haven’t fully realized just how it’s impacted my life. It has impacted my life, however. In serious and debilitating ways. I’m coming out from behind the shields I’ve put up, in hopes of successfully addressing my own (invisible) challenges and helping others to see that sustaining a TBI is not the end of the world, and they can, in fact, live happy, fulfilled, productive lives in spite of it all.

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