Making the most of my self-assessments

I’ve been doing self-assessments on a fairly regular basis, for nearly a year, now. I think the first that I started really digging in around this past February (2008), making notes about what’s been going on with me. It’s been pretty enlightening, especially considering that I had no clue to what extent my issues affected me… until I started keeping objective track.

I haven’t done the best job of staying current with my notes, but I think I’ve collected information that I can use, at present and on down the line.  I’ve resolved to do a better job, moving forward. Even if I just take a few notes at a time, that’s helpful. As long as I have it in a format that I can put with other notes. One of the issues is that I sometimes make handwritten notes, and other times I type them on a computer, into a spreadsheet or a document.

I have been trying to figure out a good way to make use of the notes I do have, so all this experience doesn’t just go to waste. I think I’m getting to a place where I can start collecting my materials and comparing my notes over time, so I can see if I’ve made any progress.

I think I have. I can tell the difference just in the past six months. People I used to annoy to no end have told me I am more communicative with them, and I make more of an effort to deal productively with them, than I did before — when I thought I was fine, but all indicators pointed to me having cognitive/behavioral issues I needed to deal with.

Collecting all my notes and looking at them, I get a little overwhelmed and agitated — angry, too — that I’ve got so much information in so many different places, and that I have to work so hard to organize it all and make sense of it. It upsets me that I’m so alone in all this — that I haven’t been able to communicate well enough with doctors and caregivers to convey the depth of my issues… that I haven’t even known how much help I really need, till lately… that even when I am able to communicate with people, their dashed hopes (about who and what I am and what my personality and life are really like) just get in the way and keep them from being really objective with me… that even if I did manage to communicate effectively with doctors and caregivers, due to recent cutbacks in funding, the chances of me getting help are even less than they were a year ago. After all, I’ve only had “mild” traumatic brain injuries, and I’m still employed, still have my house, still have my primary relationship more intact than many others (even those who haven’t sustained tbi’s)… so I need to step back and let the people with the *real* problems get access to the services they need.

And it’s true, really. I haven’t sacrificed life and limb for my nation. I haven’t had my skull smashed or pierced by a foreign object. I haven’t been in a coma. I haven’t been in the hospital. I haven’t had any medical diagnoses of tbi, because the people around me could never see that I needed help, and I even declined help when it was suggested. I haven’t sustained a terrible, life-threatening, near-disastrous, bloody open head wound that put me out of commission for weeks and months and required me to learn to walk and talk again.

I have been a lot more lucky than that. A whole lot.

But I still need help. And I have to find it somewhere. All the cumulative injuries over the course of my relatively short life have left traces – however faint – of their impact. From mood issues to communication issues. From sensory issues to behavioral issues. From my volatile temper to my willingness to just sit motionless for extended periods of time, doing and thinking absolutely nothing. I still have a long line of jobs that I couldn’t manage to hang onto — some of which I actively or involuntarily sabotaged, when the stress got to be too much. I still have the wreckage of plenty of failed friendships and people I’ve alienated without knowing what I was doing at the time, to show for my injuries.

I still have issues, and I need to deal with them, for the sake of my loved ones, friends, co-workers, home state, and country. I owe it to everyone to learn to cope with these issues as well as humanly possible, even if I cannot get “professional help” or insight and input by experts. Even if the social system is more than happy to let me fall through the cracks, I cannot — and will not — allow myself to go down easily.

I’ve got issues, so I guess I’ll have to address them myself.

I know it’s not “what the doctor ordered” for my condition. I know it’s fraught with issues and pitfalls and danger of just screwing everything up. But my doctor doesn’t really have time for me. None of my doctors really have time for me. Nor does my therapist. Nor does my neuropsychologist. Nor does the system. Nobody really has time for me — and I need a lot of time. It takes me a while to figure things out well enough to put them into words. And then it takes more time for me to work up the nerve to say the words. And then it takes more time for me to clarify what I’ve just said, because people often don’t understand me the first time around. Then it takes me more time to listen and understand their answers.

It just takes too much time for me to get my ideas across and be sure that people understand me. It takes a lot more time than anybody seems willing to give. But I’m absolutely not willing to let myself wither and die, waiting in the wings for them to notice me and take time out of their busy schedules to help me.

So, that leaves me with no alternative than to take matters into my own hands and address my issues (which I cannot seem to get across to others) in the best way possible. I know doctors look askance at this. I know this makes professional experts suspicious. Self-diagnosis is problematic. A proper course of rehabilitation should probably be put together by a qualified, certified individual with plenty of education behind them. And accurate measurements of my progress might not even be possible, coming from me. After all, I’ve got a history of brain injury.

But no one has the time to spare me — not the kind of time I need — so what else can I do? Just give up? Just take a ticket and wait in line for the next available expert, who’s probably all tuckered out from tending to the TRULY wounded? Sit around and wait to be noticed? Make a stink and force people to notice me? Pitch a fit, hire a lawyer, and expect the government to bail me out?

I don’t think so.

I have no choice. I have to deal with this myself. For better or worse, I need to take matters into my own hands and take full responsibility for my own healing, my own rehabilitation.

If the experts have something to contribute to the process, then great.

But I’m not holding my breath.

Now, back to my daily self-assessment… Today I’m doing pretty well… details to come…

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Author: brokenbrilliant

I am a long-term multiple (mild) Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI or TBI) survivor who experienced assaults, falls, car accidents, sports-related injuries in the 1960s, '70s, '80s, and '90s. My last mild TBI was in 2004, but it was definitely the worst of the lot. I never received medical treatment for my injuries, some of which were sports injuries (and you have to get back in the game!), but I have been living very successfully with cognitive/behavioral (social, emotional, functional) symptoms and complications since I was a young kid. I’ve done it so well, in fact, that virtually nobody knows that I sustained those injuries… and the folks who do know, haven’t fully realized just how it’s impacted my life. It has impacted my life, however. In serious and debilitating ways. I’m coming out from behind the shields I’ve put up, in hopes of successfully addressing my own (invisible) challenges and helping others to see that sustaining a TBI is not the end of the world, and they can, in fact, live happy, fulfilled, productive lives in spite of it all.

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