Thinking about PTSD and Tetris…

I’ve been giving some thought to the whole “Tetris fixes PTSD flashbacks” concept, over the past few weeks.

Some people agree, others don’t. Here’s an interesting discussion over at Vetvoice.com about it.

I have to admit, I have found some relief while playing Tetris. It’s so interactively neutral — no people to shoot, no mortal danger to avoid, no sudden loud sounds and flashing colors to tax my already frazzled system. I have tried playing it when I was extremely agitated about stuff that was coming up in therapy… flashbacks, in particular. For whatever reason, I found the flashbacks subsiding and images of dropping brightly-colored Tetris pieces showing up instead of the shadowy figure appearing suddenly in front of me. It seemed me me that Tetris images were literally replacing the unwanted flashbacks.

Or maybe it’s just me. But I can tell you, my system really started to chill out. I don’t think it’s a coincidence.

One of the commenters at the discussion about this over at Vetvoice.com suggested. “And why not win every tetris computer game you play, while you’re at it design a new one!”

It made sense to me, so I decided to do just that. I’ve been working on alternative versions of the game, with different colors. My first attempts are a bit rudimentary, the changes being isolated to the colors alone. But it’s working.

Tetris Screenshot 1

Tetris Screenshot 2

Tetris Screenshot 3

You can get to “PTSTetris” by following this link: http://ptstetris.110mb.com/

I don’t know if it really works, but the logic seems sound. I think we can’t make generalizations all across the board about whether it will fix what’s wrong, but if nothing else, spending a few minutes rearranging colored blocks beats flashing back on wretchedness that intrudes on my regular day, getting all anxious and agitated and freaked out over stuff that happened a long time ago in a very different place.

I’ll probably be creating more color schemes, as time goes on, but for now, at least this is up and running.

Cheers

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Author: brokenbrilliant

I am a long-term multiple (mild) Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI or TBI) survivor who experienced assaults, falls, car accidents, sports-related injuries in the 1960s, '70s, '80s, and '90s. My last mild TBI was in 2004, but it was definitely the worst of the lot. I never received medical treatment for my injuries, some of which were sports injuries (and you have to get back in the game!), but I have been living very successfully with cognitive/behavioral (social, emotional, functional) symptoms and complications since I was a young kid. I’ve done it so well, in fact, that virtually nobody knows that I sustained those injuries… and the folks who do know, haven’t fully realized just how it’s impacted my life. It has impacted my life, however. In serious and debilitating ways. I’m coming out from behind the shields I’ve put up, in hopes of successfully addressing my own (invisible) challenges and helping others to see that sustaining a TBI is not the end of the world, and they can, in fact, live happy, fulfilled, productive lives in spite of it all.

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