Daily planning tools to keep on track

It’s no secret I’m really into regularly tracking my activities and progress. I find that the more I track my progress, and the closer tabs I keep on how I’m messing up (and what I can do about it), the better I function and the better I feel about myself.  You can read how I use the system at this post.

I’ve made a new version of the form I fill out each day, for others to use. You can download it here for free: Daily Planning and Results Log Book Blank (Word document format).

Log Book View

Log Book Page 1

Log Book Page 3

Log Book Page 4

This log lets you record what you have planned to do each day at a certain time, as well as what you actually did (I tend to “wander off” and not get things done, so I need to track what I actually did instead, so I can see what motivates me to take action throughout my day). It also has a few pages for “360 feedback” notes, which are all about what you did right during the day and why… as well as what you could have done better, why that was, and what you can do different next time.

It’s based in part on the Give Back materials, which include daily planners as well as head injured moment assessments. But it’s also modified based on what I’ve learned works well for me. Give Back tends to limit the number and kinds of explanations for why things turned out like they did. Their reason lists are also a bit of a jumble with not much organization. Plus, I find that having a whole big form to fill out to explain why I screwed up, causes me to spend more time thinking about stuff, than actually doing it — with me, it leads to “analysis paralysis” — but it might not be that way for everyone. Some people, I’m sure, really benefit from extended examination of their issues.

But I tend to get so busy during my days, that I just don’t have the time for extensive analysis of my head injured moments (even though I tend to have more than a few in the course of each day). I find it most effective to keep things simple and flexible, and focus on how I get through my day… and how I can do  better the next time, if I need to refine my approaches.

I’m also creating a version of this log that is book-length and spiral bound. It’s very simple and straightforward — just a bound copy of about a month’s worth of forms, to make it easier to keep organized. I’m presently creating it on Lulu.com and it will be available shortly for folks who want to buy a copy of the book that collects everything in one place.

I tend to keep all my forms clipped together in a stack, which isn’t the neatest way to do things. But that’s just me. I will probably order my own spiral bound copy, in any case, because the printing is going to be nicer than my own printer, and it won’t smear when I mark it all up with my highlighters. Also, having it all in one place — what a concept!

Just so you know, there the book-length workbook will cost money to buy. But there’s no obligation to purchase anything. Honestly, we pay enough as head injury survivors, in terms of daily difficulties. Why add to the burden? The  book-length version is just a neater and more orderly print alternative to the 4-page version (which is a free download).

For the download, you can grab the Word document and then print it out and fill it in by hand or you can put it on your computer and type in the information. Either way — whatever works best for you. I tend to handwrite all my notes, because I’m not always at a computer, and I don’t want my recovery to be dependent on technology. Plus, I like to color-code my info, so it’s easier to decipher later (that’s sometimes a challenge).

Oh, if you don’t have Microsoft Word on your computer, you can download a copy of OpenOffice (www.openoffice.org) for free — it has all the applications you find in MS Office — word, powerpoint, spreadsheet, even database. But it’s Free. As in — costs you no money at all.

Me? I’m big into free. So, if you want to use this log, and you need a word processing program that rocks, check out Open Office.

Well, must run – the day is waiting.

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Author: brokenbrilliant

I am a long-term multiple (mild) Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI or TBI) survivor who experienced assaults, falls, car accidents, sports-related injuries in the 1960s, '70s, '80s, and '90s. My last mild TBI was in 2004, but it was definitely the worst of the lot. I never received medical treatment for my injuries, some of which were sports injuries (and you have to get back in the game!), but I have been living very successfully with cognitive/behavioral (social, emotional, functional) symptoms and complications since I was a young kid. I’ve done it so well, in fact, that virtually nobody knows that I sustained those injuries… and the folks who do know, haven’t fully realized just how it’s impacted my life. It has impacted my life, however. In serious and debilitating ways. I’m coming out from behind the shields I’ve put up, in hopes of successfully addressing my own (invisible) challenges and helping others to see that sustaining a TBI is not the end of the world, and they can, in fact, live happy, fulfilled, productive lives in spite of it all.

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