Wish List Item #1: Consistent quality information about TBI

m had some extensive comments to one of my earlier posts — good stuff that bears repeating:

…. Over the past few years I have seen the quality and availability of information increase exponentially. As I mentioned brainline.org is a great resource. ABIN-Pa and BI-IFEA are two other grassroots organizations – one a local chapter that is very active and the other a web based group with many subset topics with extensive memberships and resource links. And the DCOE has tons of information, including many daily information bulletins and news updates on research, and studies.

I had heard about the BI-IFEA from Kathe Perez, but since it’s a LinkedIn group, which is part of a professional networking site, I’m reluctant to even go close to it. I’m on LinkedIn, but there is no way on earth I am going to reveal to the larger professional community that I’m a multiple TBI survivor. In these economic times, I’m not taking chances with people’s tolerance and enlightenment levels. It’s just too risky. It’s a shame I can’t get to their resource lists. I’ll have to check out the DCOE site. At first glance, it looks quite good.

The Brain Injury Association of America has a very deep site and many individual states have great BIA sites with lots of material, presentations, white papers, events, video clips etc as well as links to site specific topics – Wisconsin, NJ, New York, Pennsylvania, California, Kansas are just a few of the state groups that have extensive websites. I am also involved with a project to create a single point of access/repository for all materials produced or available through these individual brain injury organizations creating a consolidated library of information for free public use.

Thank heaven for that! You go… I’ve been thinking about how much we need something like that — a clearinghouse of all the collected information from the different BIA chapters. Having it segmented out from state to state is tremendously frustrating. From where I’m sitting, there should be a central BIA database from which all the chapters pull – not individual respositories. Have a decent data warehouse — at the very least, a DB with meta data which indexes all the collected information and links to it, for common access — and break out the individual state-specific info based on a field in the DB. Please, please, please enlist the help of a competent data architect to design the DB  — I’m assuming, perhaps erroneously, that you’re not such a person. Having a properly designed and normalized database for this can make everyone’s life a whole lot easier. I’m happy to help with the DB design (I’ve done a bit of it, myself, in my day — for large-scale enterprises with millions of customers — scale, baby, scale) so let me know if I can contribute somehow. Hmmm… now you’ve got me thinking… I’ll have to capture what’s coming to mind.

Individual hospitals that are part of the Models of Care System produce a large number of research reports and papers – available through their individual sites, the BI Models of Care site and through the COMBI site. The Dana Foundation has a lot of brain research information. And then there are special sites like Give Back Orlando etc.

And here’s yet another one of my frustrations — there’s all this great information out there, but it’s not generally available to people, unless they know what to look/ask for… or they connect with another person who has that specific knowledge about the sites. Ugh – it’s just so frustrating. Will a returning vet understand how/where to look — or their spouse? Or their significant others/family/friends, etc? And if they do find their way to the info, will they be able to get to it, to navigate it? It’s the eternal issue with the online world — figuring out what info is where, and how to use it. As much as everyone likes to come up with their own site design, it would be nice if folks could agree on a best-practices information architecture, especially with regard to TBI information. And then we have the issue of the content itself — is it scholarly, academic, accessible to everyone, written for the general population… what? Even if you are fortunate enough to find something, can you actually use it?

Is the information quality? I’d say for the most part yes, it comes from studies and current research and people in the field. Some sources are more open to ‘outside the box’ stuff such as HBOT, TCM, neurofeedback, meditation, yoga, etc etc. And some are more conservative in their approach. Generally special interests groups are NOT involved – such as the pharm industry – but of course any given research group has bias and their own perspective. It doesn’t invalidate their data but it may make it more applicable to an individual demographic or subset. How much does commercial money influence people? As much as it does with heart medicine, diabetes, etc etc. – that is to say that they give more money for certain kinds of research. But the range of studies is promising and if the results yield something positive, the money will likely follow.

Yes, quality information is key. But again, can people use it? I think there should be some sort of hierarchy established, some sort of ontology of sorts, around the type of information that’s out there.

As for ‘outside the box’ therapies, if they work and they aren’t dangerous, I think they can be an important part of recovery. Some of the more fringe treatments worry me, and I tend to be concerned about extremes of scientific/medical rigor — folks that are totally into it, can let it keep valuable treatments from the population, while folks who want to just get treatments into the hands of the needy may bypass the “quality assurance” stage. Conundrum! I think there needs to be a middle-ground somewhere.

Regarding commercial interests, I was thinking more along the lines of rehabs plugging their own flavor of TBI rehabilitation, to attract new patients. Or doctors who are proposing radical new treatments which may or may not work — I’m thinking here of  Dr. Daniel Amen and his SPECT-scan-based approach. Maybe it works, maybe it doesn’t, but “It requires the injection of a radioactive material,” which I do not find particularly appealing. I had an MRI and they gave me a contrast agent which made me ill (and I’ve read it may have a bad effect on my kidneys). However, someone who is desperate for help, might go down that route — “Shoot me up, baby! I’m suffering, and nobody gives a damn!”.

This is just one example I can think of, off-hand. Given that CAM or non-traditional healing is generally not covered by insurance, and people are prepared to pay for it anyway, it opens the door to even more questionable stuff, which people may feel is worth the risk and the expense, because they cannot get any sort of help or information anywhere else.

Personally, from what I’ve observed among friends and acquaintances, people are willing to put up with all sorts of “treatments” from alternative “healers” in no small part because the “healers” are so willing to share information, and they genuinely care for the people they’re working with. One example I can think of, was an “aesthetician” I once met (read manicurist and pedicurist and beauty salon owner) who wanted to do more for her clients, so she went to some workshops and took some classes, and started representing herself as a “cranial sacral practitioner” — just because she did laying on of hands on people’s heads and lower backs. True story. And scary.  Care is so very important — but it needs to be accompanied by intelligence, competence, integrity, and quality control.

Having good information available to people who need it in a way that’s accessible is an important first step.

Author: brokenbrilliant

I am a long-term multiple (mild) Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI or TBI) survivor who experienced assaults, falls, car accidents, sports-related injuries in the 1960s, '70s, '80s, and '90s. My last mild TBI was in 2004, but it was definitely the worst of the lot. I never received medical treatment for my injuries, some of which were sports injuries (and you have to get back in the game!), but I have been living very successfully with cognitive/behavioral (social, emotional, functional) symptoms and complications since I was a young kid. I’ve done it so well, in fact, that virtually nobody knows that I sustained those injuries… and the folks who do know, haven’t fully realized just how it’s impacted my life. It has impacted my life, however. In serious and debilitating ways. I’m coming out from behind the shields I’ve put up, in hopes of successfully addressing my own (invisible) challenges and helping others to see that sustaining a TBI is not the end of the world, and they can, in fact, live happy, fulfilled, productive lives in spite of it all.

Talk about this - No email is required

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.