21 Tips to Keep Your Shit Together When You’re Depressed.

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21 Tips to Keep Your Shit Together When You’re Depressed.

A while ago, I penned a fairly angry response to something circulating on the internet – the 21 Habits of Happy People. It pissed me off beyond belief, that there was an inference that if you weren’t Happy, you simply weren’t doing the right things.

I’ve had depression for as long as I can remember. It’s manifested in different ways. I did therapy. I did prozac. I did more therapy. My baseline is melancholic. I’d just made peace with it when I moved, unintentionally, to a place that had markedly less sunshine in the winter. I got seasonal depression. I got that under control. Then I got really, really sick. Turns out it’s a permanent, painful genetic disorder. My last pain-free day was four years ago.

So, this Cult of Happy article just set me off. Just… anger. Rage. Depression is serious – debilitating, often dangerous, and it’s got an enormous stigma. It leaves people to fend for themselves.

It’s bad enough without people ramming Happy Tips at you through facebook. There is no miracle behaviour change that will flip that switch for you. I know, I’ve tried.

Keep reading… >>

Author: brokenbrilliant

I am a long-term multiple (mild) Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI or TBI) survivor who experienced assaults, falls, car accidents, sports-related injuries in the 1960s, '70s, '80s, and '90s. My last mild TBI was in 2004, but it was definitely the worst of the lot. I never received medical treatment for my injuries, some of which were sports injuries (and you have to get back in the game!), but I have been living very successfully with cognitive/behavioral (social, emotional, functional) symptoms and complications since I was a young kid. I’ve done it so well, in fact, that virtually nobody knows that I sustained those injuries… and the folks who do know, haven’t fully realized just how it’s impacted my life. It has impacted my life, however. In serious and debilitating ways. I’m coming out from behind the shields I’ve put up, in hopes of successfully addressing my own (invisible) challenges and helping others to see that sustaining a TBI is not the end of the world, and they can, in fact, live happy, fulfilled, productive lives in spite of it all.

3 thoughts on “21 Tips to Keep Your Shit Together When You’re Depressed.”

  1. Depression is serious, and there is no magic trick to making people “Happy”. I feel your pain as I see this genetic disorder in my son. It’s hard to understand and I wish I could fix it! I have found that he isn’t “broken”, it’s just who he is! I love him, depressed or not.

    Depression has so many different levels. I’ve experienced a few very dark days and it jolted me into reality of knowing they were the most difficult days of my TBI! From those days on, I’ve had an entire new perspective on depression! Our brains are so fragile by injuries and genetics. What is “normal” anyway? What’s behind the smiles of people? Is it really happiness?

    I’m here to be supportive. Take care and stay safe.

    Like

  2. Thanks – fortunately with me, depression comes and goes. It’s not a constant thing with me. On the other hand, keeping my sh*t together in general is a full-time job.

    Sorry to hear about your son – that is tough. Personally, I think people who *aren’t* depressed these days need to get their heads examined. I’m only half-joking.

    Well, so it goes. Never boring.

    Thanks for your support.

    Like

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