Well, so much for my new neuro…

The Neurologist by Jose Perez (Oil on Canvas, 24 in x 30 in, 61.5 cm x 77 cm)

Last night I got a letter from my new neuro — you know, the one I had to wait five months to see, because the insurance company wasn’t transferring their credentials from their old hospital, and they didn’t aggressively follow up…

Turns out, due to family obligations, they need to move out of state. They’re leaving at the end of June.

As they say in a crowded waiting room… Next!

I’m not sure how I feel about this whole thing. It’s annoying and disappointing, but it’s also kind of a relief.

On the one hand, I had to wait months to finally get to see them, but I was hoping it was worth it. It seemed like they were someone I could work with. I’ve been wanting to find a decent neuro, and they came highly recommended, so I waited. And I felt like I could work with them.

If I’m going to work with a neurologist, I really need to establish an extended relationship with them, so they can understand me and I can understand them. It’s not easy for me. It takes time. So, having them leave now is a blessing in disguise. At least I didn’t sink a lot of time and energy into that relationship.But the fact that I had to wait five months to see them, is five months of lost time — the whole time I could have spent finding another neuro to work with. And not had them skedaddle.

On the other hand, I’m not sure I want to develop a relationship with a neurologist. That initial visit really took the steam out of me. Covering all the details was draining, and even though I did feel like we got off to an okay start, it’s still kind of thrown me into a tailspin, having to factor in the whole diagnostic adventure. Migraine. Photophobia. Possible dysautonomia. Etc. I’ve got a lot going on with me, and I’m accustomed to managing things myself. So, adding in more input and requirements (especially meds) is pretty disruptive. It means I have to rethink a lot of things about my life. And make some changes that aren’t easy for me to make.

And there’s no guarantee they’re going to actually help me beyond what I can do for myself.

It’s nice to have some Imitrex handy, in case I get one of those crippling migraines again, but to be truthful, I don’t know that I’d even take it. Which is worse? The pain or the side-effects? At least with pain, I can function. Side effects… who knows?

The other thing is, all the doctors I’ve met (including this neuro) seem to have preconceived notions about how people who’ve sustained multiple concussions function and behave. When I tell them my history, they literally look at me like I have two heads, and they talk to me more slowly.

It’s almost like they expect me to be an idiot, or something. I mean, yeah – I do tend to forget things that people tell me in a matter of minutes, if I don’t take extra steps to remember it. But that doesn’t mean I’m an idiot. Nor does it mean I’m less intelligent.

Argh! It makes me crazy when people equate memory with intelligence or the ability to function. I mean, my resistance to short-term interference is close to the very bottom of the scale — that hasn’t changed in 6+ years of rehabilitation. But does that make me less intelligent or less capable of processing information in different ways? Oh, HELL no!

I simply have a different way of processing things, is all.

So effing there.

Anyway, it’s an amazingly beautiful day, and I managed to get an acupuncture appointment this morning — woot woot! It’s been a while, since I last had one, and I’ve been needing it. Coordinating all this healthcare is a huge pain in the ass. Between neurologists and orthopedists and chiropractors and acupuncturists and neuropsychologists and counseling (which is actually more of a check-in for me once a month to see how I’m doing), plus my day-job, meetings with recruiters, plus all the other things I do with myself, my proverbial dance card is FULL. Sigh.

But that’s changing… I can take the neuro out of the mix. I got my MRI and everything looks fine. I had a neck x-ray this past week, and other than a little arthritis, things are good. Overall, I’m in decent shape, and now I’ve done my periodic check-up for certain key areas that have been concerning me. It’s not any particular disorder. It’s just wear and tear from life. So it goes.

Anyway, since it is such a beautiful day, I’m going out for a walk.

Because I can.

Onward.

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Author: brokenbrilliant

I am a long-term multiple (mild) Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI or TBI) survivor who experienced assaults, falls, car accidents, sports-related injuries in the 1960s, '70s, '80s, and '90s. My last mild TBI was in 2004, but it was definitely the worst of the lot. I never received medical treatment for my injuries, some of which were sports injuries (and you have to get back in the game!), but I have been living very successfully with cognitive/behavioral (social, emotional, functional) symptoms and complications since I was a young kid. I’ve done it so well, in fact, that virtually nobody knows that I sustained those injuries… and the folks who do know, haven’t fully realized just how it’s impacted my life. It has impacted my life, however. In serious and debilitating ways. I’m coming out from behind the shields I’ve put up, in hopes of successfully addressing my own (invisible) challenges and helping others to see that sustaining a TBI is not the end of the world, and they can, in fact, live happy, fulfilled, productive lives in spite of it all.

2 thoughts on “Well, so much for my new neuro…”

  1. It’s sad and funny that they expect you/us to be an idiot. Wonder how self-perpetuating that is hey? And how potentially harmful it is. They don’t have that deep understanding that you do though. And they don’t have the years of adapting and _developing_ and _growing_ over the changes/concussions over the years that you’ve done. Despite all the talk of neuroplasticity and whatnot, they’re all pitifully ignorant of how differently it does shape a person when that person is shaped by brain injury and adversity. Intelligence finds a way around things and peeks through no matter what. So HA 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  2. It is incredibly counter-productive. And it used to be srlf-perpetuating, before I learned better. You are so right about how much it changes us and the ways in which it alters us. And how they really have no clue. Too much time sitting in offices.

    Like

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