White Matter Injuries in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Posttraumatic Migraines: Diffusion Entropy Analysis

From Radiology:

Original Research in Neuroradiology

Abstract

To determine the performance of Shannon entropy (SE) as a diagnostic tool in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) with posttraumatic migraines (PTMs) and those without PTMs on the basis of analysis of fractional anisotropy (FA) maps.

Materials and Methods

The institutional review board approved this retrospective study, with waiver of informed consent. FA maps were obtained and neurocognitive testing was performed in 74 patients with mTBI (57 with PTM, 17 without PTM). FA maps were obtained in 22 healthy control subjects and in 20 control patients with migraine headaches. Mean FA and SE were extracted from total brain FA histograms and were compared between patients with mTBI and control subjects and between patients with and those without PTM. Mean FA and SE were correlated with clinical variables and were used to determine the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUCs) and likelihood ratios for mTBI and development of PTM.

Results

Author: brokenbrilliant

I am a long-term multiple (mild) Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI or TBI) survivor who experienced assaults, falls, car accidents, sports-related injuries in the 1960s, '70s, '80s, and '90s. My last mild TBI was in 2004, but it was definitely the worst of the lot. I never received medical treatment for my injuries, some of which were sports injuries (and you have to get back in the game!), but I have been living very successfully with cognitive/behavioral (social, emotional, functional) symptoms and complications since I was a young kid. I’ve done it so well, in fact, that virtually nobody knows that I sustained those injuries… and the folks who do know, haven’t fully realized just how it’s impacted my life. It has impacted my life, however. In serious and debilitating ways. I’m coming out from behind the shields I’ve put up, in hopes of successfully addressing my own (invisible) challenges and helping others to see that sustaining a TBI is not the end of the world, and they can, in fact, live happy, fulfilled, productive lives in spite of it all.

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