Views from an Injured Brain

This is a great post by Nick Verron. I just now discovered his blog, and already I’m getting a lot from what he has to say. Enjoy…

Nick Verron

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I write predominantly about issues I’ve experienced. Although my situation is very unique, I have come to realise that the resulting issues I’ve faced are shared by many. I would very much like to hear if others have experienced similar ones.

It’s scientifically argued that You are defined by the composition of your brain. It’s therefore justified to feel that when you’ve had a brain injury resulting in parts of your brain not functioning  properly, or at all, that the injury is to who you are. Basically, a brain injury makes You feel lesser.

A little clarification after a brain injury would go a long way in  limiting this destructive thought process. What defines who You are is your mind, which is a product of the early structure of your brain. Once formed though, it isn’t fixed. As we use a very small percentage of our brains, our minds can utilise spare brain

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Author: brokenbrilliant

I am a long-term multiple (mild) Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI or TBI) survivor who experienced assaults, falls, car accidents, sports-related injuries in the 1960s, '70s, '80s, and '90s. My last mild TBI was in 2004, but it was definitely the worst of the lot. I never received medical treatment for my injuries, some of which were sports injuries (and you have to get back in the game!), but I have been living very successfully with cognitive/behavioral (social, emotional, functional) symptoms and complications since I was a young kid. I’ve done it so well, in fact, that virtually nobody knows that I sustained those injuries… and the folks who do know, haven’t fully realized just how it’s impacted my life. It has impacted my life, however. In serious and debilitating ways. I’m coming out from behind the shields I’ve put up, in hopes of successfully addressing my own (invisible) challenges and helping others to see that sustaining a TBI is not the end of the world, and they can, in fact, live happy, fulfilled, productive lives in spite of it all.

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