Connections between pain and PTSD

The past couple of weeks have been crazy for me, and it’s taken somewhat of a toll. I’ve been busy with work, busy with other activities, busy, busy, and more busy. I also did some traveling for about a week to out-of-state relatives, for a big family get-together. In and of itself, it was a great time. But the change in my schedule, the long hours of driving — over 30 hours, all told, in the car — not being able to get enough sleep, and the change in food choices (how do they eat that stuff?) all threw me off, big-time.

I managed to keep it together and not completely blow-out/melt down during the trip, or immediately afterwards, which often happens when I travel to this particular branch of the family tree. But the past few weeks have been packed full of crazy-busy-ness that I now realize has been a pretty concerted effort to dull the pain of the trip.

I’m not talking about emotional pain… though it’s never easy to spend time as an outsider, when everyone else is connecting and having a wonderful time being together — I’m the oddest bird in the family, and between my difficulties in keeping up with what’s going on around me and my narrow and intense interests that aren’t run-of-the-mill, people often don’t know what to do with me.

What I’m talking about is physical pain.

Yes, physical pain — the kind that burns, that aches, that throbs, that stings. The kind that makes my clothing hurt me, that rakes my legs when my pants rub against them… the kind that makes me jump whenever someone touches me… the kind that sends a shock wave of smacking ache to the marrow of my bones when my spouse puts their hand on my forearm… the kind that keeps me from sleeping, because I can’t stand the feel of sheets on me, but I also can’t stand the feel of air-conditioning blowing across my skin… the kind htat gets worse when I am stressed or tired or upset or all of the above… the kind that I often don’t even know is there until someone makes contact with me, and I jump, and they feel like they’ve done something to hurt me. They have. They didn’t mean to, and they would never do it on purpose. But they hurt me.

It’s not just the emotional pain of family visits that gest me. It’s the physical pain, as well.

Here’s the deal — for as long as I can remember, I have had issues with a whole slew of sensory problems, the most disruptive of which was body-wide pain. I can remember, ever since I was a little kid, feeling like I was being hit, when people would just reach out to touch me in very innocent, social, appropriate ways. I would shrink back from them, and they would often take offense or get angry with me for “rejecting” them. It sorta kinda messes with your head, when the people who love you the most cause you intense pain when they try to show their affection for you. And it tends to muck up your relationship with them, when you can’t accept their (appropriate) affection, but they don’t understand why.

To tell the truth, I didn’t even understand why. It’s hard to explain, unless you’ve been there, but the experience of painful touch is such a visceral, physical thing, it sometimes doesn’t translate into words. It’s just there. You can’t describe it, you can’t even really pinpoint it. Sometimes you have no idea it’s there, until someone makes contact with you. Then, all you know is, it hurts, and you pull away to avoid it, so you can just get on with your life.

And you do things to avoid/mitigate it. You steer clear of expressive people. You avoid demonstrative friends. You always keep more than arms’ length away from other people, just in case they reach out to you. You spend time with people who either don’t like you or couldn’t care less about you, because the chances of them touching you is small to none — and it’s easier to be around those types of people, than the friendly ones who like to make contact.

These things are done on a subconscious, instinctive level, and sometimes they don’t even register with you when you’re doing them. Like pulling away from people when they come close. Like shrinking back from a hug someone is trying to give you. Like jerking away quickly when someone touches you accidentally.

And depending on how sudden or shocking the pain is, it can trigger a whole cascade of other sensations/symptoms/reactions that look a whole lot like PTSD.

Over at Helpguide.org, I found this list of symptoms

Re-experiencing the traumatic event

  • Intrusive, upsetting memories of the event — memories of past painful contact tend to show up suddenly
  • Flashbacks (acting or feeling like the event is happening again) — yes, it does feel like it’s happening all over again
  • Nightmares (either of the event or of other frightening things) — sometimes nightmares do follow an extremely painful episode, tho’ that’s rare
  • Feelings of intense distress when reminded of the trauma — yes, it is intensely distressing to be reminded of it, it just sends me in a downward spiral
  • Intense physical reactions to reminders of the event (e.g. pounding heart, rapid breathing, nausea, muscle tension, sweating) — my heart sometimes starts pounding, I tense up, and I feel sick to my stomach, when people touch me, sometimes

PTSD symptoms of avoidance and emotional numbing

  • Avoiding activities, places, thoughts, or feelings that remind you of the trauma — I tend to avoid physical human contact of any kind; women frighten me, because they tend to be so tactile, and it’s literally too painful at times, to interact with them
  • Inability to remember important aspects of the trauma — I tend to block out the particulars of painful experiences. All I know is, it’s hurt me before, like it’s doing now
  • Loss of interest in activities and life in general — Why should I get involved, if it’s just going to hurt like the dickens?
  • Feeling detached from others and emotionally numb — Oh, yes… ’nuff said.
  • Sense of a limited future (you don’t expect to live a normal life span, get married, have a career) — how precisely am I supposed to live fully, if the experience of basic human interactions promises me pain?

PTSD symptoms of increased arousal

  • Difficulty falling or staying asleep — could have something to do with my insomnia?
  • Irritability or outbursts of anger — yet one more contributing factor
  • Difficulty concentrating — it’s tough to concentrate, when you’re on high alert. Especially if you’re working with tactile people.
  • Hypervigilance (on constant “red alert”) — someone might be approaching…
  • Feeling jumpy and easily startled — but of course

Other common symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder

  • Anger and irritability — not being able to establish comfortable human contact makes me nuts and pisses me off
  • Guilt, shame, or self-blame — why can’t I just be normal like everyone else and tolerate a hand on my shoulder?
  • Substance abuse — been there. Thank heavens that’s behind me.
  • Depression and hopelessness — my occasional visitors
  • Suicidal thoughts and feelings — once upon a time, occasional visitors. Now, very rarely.
  • Feeling alienated and alone — not just feeling… BEING alienated and alone
  • Feelings of mistrust and betrayal — it’s hard to not feel that way, when everyone around you might possibly cause you pain
  • Headaches, stomach problems, chest pain — the first two, yes. The third, not so much

So there we have it — PTSD arising from chronic body-wide pain. Painful touch. There’s even a word for it — Allodynia (meaning “other pain”) — a painful response to a usually non-painful (innocuous) stimulus. I haven’t been formally diagnosed. That would require that I talk about it to my doctor. And talking about it out loud to anyone has never really been an option for me, except for with my last therapist who is long gone by now. It’s just too painful. Emotionally and physically.

I’d rather keep my own counsel and just live my life. Pain-free. Alone, but pain-free.

Being alone not only keeps me out of arms’ reach (literally) from people who may hurt me, but it also keeps emotional upheaval at a minimum. It’s hard to get worked into a state, when you don’t have much contact with people who affect you emotionally. I can block out all the politics and social drama pretty well. But the emotional connections I have with people… well, they’re trickier. So, I steer clear of them, by and large. And I steer clear of emotionally charged subjects with people — like avoiding talking about my chronic pain issues with my doctor.

It’s wild, how emotional distress can heighten physical pain. Emotional pain sets off an alarm state with me, and that alarm state unleases a whole avalanche of stress hormones and hypersensitive biochemical agents into my system. And the buildup of all the stuff that gets “stuck” in my system does not help me. Not one bit.

Over at Healthjourneys.com, Belleruth Naparstek quotes from her book Invisible Heroes and describes it well:

Chronic Pain Conditions
This constant activation of the alarm state leads to an accumulation of metabolic waste products in the muscle fibers, and the release of kinins and other chemical pain generators in the tissue, resulting in myofascial pain and the appearance of those seemingly intractable chronic conditions such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic headache, TMJ and more.

And because these conditions are generated in the brain stem and the motor reflex centers in the spinal column, and routed through a perturbed, automatic, arousal circuitry, peripheral forms of treatment provide only temporary relief.  Constantly activated by everyday sensory cues, normal muscle movement and spontaneous memories, symptoms grow and become more and more entrenched over time.  In other words, this is one nasty gift from the kindled feedback loop that, if not interrupted, will just keep on giving.

Our epidemiology research has already shown us an astounding percentage of people with baffling chronic pain conditions and “functional” diseases that have no obvious causes, who have been found to have prior histories of severe trauma.  Probably if we could tease out the subset of traumatized people who experienced substantial dissociation during their trauma, and a truncated freeze response in the midst of it, we might find closer to one hundred percent suffering from posttraumatic stress.  Unfortunately for them, they are often assumed to be malingering or engaged in attention-seeking behavior for neurotic reasons, instead of suffering from a very serious, self perpetuating condition with a potentially worsening trajectory.

Included in this group of maligned and misunderstood patients would be scores of people suffering from pelvic and low back pain, orofacial and myofascial pain, genito-urinary and abdominal pain; interstitial cystitis; and the previously mentioned headache, fibromyalgia (FM), chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), and reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD); irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disorder (IBD), multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) and migraine.

And there it is — in part, anyway. The post over at Belleruth Naparstek’s blog asks Is There a Connection Between Fibromyalgia and Traumatic Stress? but it’s not just about Fibro, to me. It’s about the “and more” she mentions. It’s about the “whole lot more”.

So, what the hell can I do about this? I’m of the mind that the best reason to talk about anything difficult, is to figure out what to do about it to make it better. To reduce the quotient of human suffering in the world. That includes my suffering (I’m in the world, after all). What can I do about this pain business?

Well, first, I need to get back on my schedule. I need to get back to my sleeping routine, which I’ve been doing pretty well with. I need to get back to eating the right kinds of foods at the right times of day — and I’ve been doing that pretty well, too. I also need to exercise and do other things that will enable me to discharge some of the built-up stress from the trip. I tried explaining to my new therapist how disruptive that sort of travel is to me, but they didn’t seem to “get” the intensity of it, so I’m not getting much support there. Screw it. I’ll support myself. I’ve been having a lot of good long cries, in the privacy of my own company, over the past few days, and that seems to be helping me. I also need to get back to my regular work schedule and just get some stuff done. Being productive has a way of chilling me out nicely, so I’ll do that.

And drink plenty of water. Take some Advil before I go to sleep. Listen to the Healing Trauma CD from Belleruth Naparstek to deal with the PTSD. Have a good cry. And another. And another. And make sure I let loose in my own company, away from others who neither understand nor want to understand just how hard things are for me… and end up minimizing and negating and invalidating my feelings about what I really go through, and tell me I’m fine and I don’t have a problem and I shouldn’t worry about this stuff,  just because they either don’t have the emotional resources to hang with me, or they’d be too traumatized, themselves, if they knew what it’s really like to live in this body.

Most of all, I need to keep it simple. Count my blessings. Remember just much good there is, along with the bad. And remember, tomorrow is another day, and all things considered, I’m pretty lucky to be alive.

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Good progress on the insomnia front

Something quite magical has been happening in my life, lately — I’ve been getting more than 6 hours of sleep each night. To people who have no trouble falling asleep and staying that way until they get 8 hours, this might not seem like a big deal, but it is to me.

Leading up to my last MTBI, I couldn’t sleep much more than 3-4 hours a night. I got 5 hours if I was lucky. I was regularly waking up at 3 a.m. (after getting in bed around 11-11:30)… just waking up. BAM – I’d be awake – and I couldn’t get back to sleep, no matter how I tried.  My system was fried, my mind was fried, my life was fried. I was in a crazy intensely stressful job that was tweaking my PTSD off the charts. And when I fell down the stairs at the end of 2004 and hit my head hard on the top 3 stairs, it was the coup de grace (pun intended) of a long progression of gradually worsening conditions in my life.

In a way, it was a good thing that I had to leave that job within the  year after my TBI, but I really miss the money…

Anyway, after I fell, my insomnia did not improve at all. And then more crap started happening in my life — family emergencies and tragedies, medical crises, personal crises… everything got even more intense, even more crazy, and it was impossible for me to tell what exactly was going on or why things were getting so mucked up. It was like my brain was in suspended animation — nothing seemed to be firing properly, nothing seemed to be working as it should. It would have made me nuts, if I’d understood what was going on, but I didn’t.

As you may or may not know, slowly things have clarified for me, and I’ve taken a lot of steps over the past years to set things to right. But one important aspect has eluded me — getting enough sleep. I had gotten acclimated to getting maybe 6 hours a night, and I thought I was doing well when that was happening. But plenty of people have informed me that you really need 8-9 hours each night, if you’re going to function properly.

I took a good hard look at my life, and I realized that yes, I actually was usually exhausted. I was usually overly fatigued. I had just gotten used to the feel of it, I’d acclimated to the experience, to the point where I thought it didn’t bother me. It was just how it was… I had resigned myself to being constantly tired, and I kept myself going on caffeine and projects and having a jam-packed schedule all the time. I left myself no downtime at all. If I had downtime, I just felt bad, so I didn’t bother giving myself any rest.

Like I said, on a certain level it didn’t bother me. But logically, I could see that something was amiss. Everyone was telling me I needed more sleep — from friends to family to therapists to doctors — and it occurred to me that what they were saying probably had merit. They were folks I trusted, and whose input I believed. They had no reason to deceive me, and I had no reason to disbelieve them.

So, going by a purely rational approach, I decided to try to get more sleep. And I tried to stop pretending that being tired all the time was okay.

I tried:

  • Taking naps whenever I could, especially on weekends.
  • Taking Benadryl to knock myself out, when I couldn’t even begin to relax.
  • Doing very rigorous chores that wore me out.
  • Taking hot showers to relax.
  • Listening to guided meditation (Belleruth Naparstek’s “Stress Hardiness Optimization” CD, especially)
  • Doing progressive relaxation.
  • Deep breathing and counting my breaths and alternating opening and closing my eyes at longer and longer intervals, so that my body would get the idea I was going to sleep.
  • Closing my eyes and moving them around behind closed eyelids — like I was in REM sleep.
  • Sleeping in different places – in the guest bedroom, on the living room couch, in the car.
  • Meditation
  • Exercising mor
  • Tracking the amount of sleep I was getting, so that I could tell — objectively — when I was probably over-tired (when I’m over-tired, it’s hard for me to tell subjectively that something is wrong)

All these things, to some extent have helped me. And over the past several months, I’ve been able to sleep more and more. I’ve now gotten to the point where I can literally sleep 8-9 hours, under the right conditions, which is a really “new” experience for me in light of my past 6 years or so.

I have also found it helpful to learn about the parasympathetic nervous system and the important jobs it does in maintaining health and vitality. Doing things like deep breathing and relaxation to help jump-start my parasympathetic recovery from stress, has been a big part of helping me get to sleep. The more relaxed I am, when I go to bed, the easier it is to sleep.

It might sound basic and obvious, but that fact eluded me for many years.

Recording my hours of sleep each night has been really helpful, just so I can tell how I’m doing and where I need to improve. After all the last thing I want, is to undermine my health just because I can’t subjectively assess the level of my fatigue. If I can’t do it subjectively (when someone asks me how I’m feeling, even if I’m exhausted, if I’m caught up in a project or I’m “locked on target” for something I need to get done, I am honestly feeling no pain or fatigue), I can do it objectively by tracking my hours of sleep each night.

Most of all, I’ve been benefited by listening to Belleruth Naparstek’s “Stress Hardiness Optimization” CD — especially the last 2 tracks for relaxation and restful sleep. I put on my headphones and play the last 2 tracks, and I’m usually asleep by the middle of the first track. If I can’t sleep by then, I’m usually under a few minutes into the “restful sleep” track. In fact, it’s worked so well that I haven’t the faintest idea what’s at the end of the “restful sleep” track, since I’ve slept through it over and over.

I make a point of listening to the CD every day for several weeks, then I’ll take a little break, and go back to it. I’m a real believer in it, and since I’ve become  increasingly sensitive to Benadryl (it knocks me out too much over the following days – it has a very long half-life), the guided imagery has turned out to be my “prescription” of choice for insomnia.

So, now I know I have tools to help me sleep when I need it. And that takes the pressure off… which also helps me relax… and sleep.

What will you do with your one precious life?

I’m reading “The Leader of the Future”, a collection of essays on leadership and leading written by people who make a point of knowing about that stuff. It’s quite inspirational. I can really use it, because I’m starting to lose momentum with some of the important work I’m doing. I have to get my act together and talk to people, but all of a sudden, I’m getting turned around.

I need to step back, focus in and prioritize. Stay the course. Don’t get too distracted by Phase II and Phase III details. Pick and choose. Take in inspiration, as well as cranking it out. Read “The Leader of the Future” and ponder what the experts have to say.

In the midst of all my busy-ness, I’ve been contemplating fecundity, lately. I look around and I see how lavish and almost obscene the world is with all its variety and its intensity and its energy and its depth. We really are living in an energetic amusement park. I can’t believe how much is involved in little, tiny, “simple” things like getting ready for work in the morning. There’s just so much to it, if we care to take a look.

At the core of this has been my re-surging awareness of mortality. When I was a kid, I was pretty caught up in an awareness of death. Lots of people in my life either died or moved on, so there was this constant sense of loss and, well, death. And I was pretty maudlin about it, at times.

On the other hand, I was really — magically, intensely, wonderfully — caught up in the Experience of the Goodness of it all. Just drunk with love of life. Intense, all around. That intensity followed me through my childhood and youth and into my adulthood, keeping me moving from job to job, from place to place, never wanting to settle down for long, because there was always something else to see, hear, feel, experience. And all I really cared about was soaking it ALL up, so I could be the best artist/poet/novelist/essayist I could be. My life was my art, and it was a perpetual work in progress. I was on a mission to experience as much of life as I could, while I could. Because I was always very aware of my mortality, just lurking ’round the corner…

Now, over the past 15 years or so, as my life has stabilized and I’ve gradually moved away from that experience-focused approach to life, I’ve settled into a kind of systematic lull. And in the process of just going about my business, I kind of got “glazed over” with the daily heating-and-cooling of my energies, like I’ve been lacquered by pedestrian life. Going through the motions of the everyday… having unfortunate things happen… getting injured, getting hurt… recovering from the incidents… having more shit hit the fan… rebounding from that… Always moving forward… Life has slowly but surely melted and hardened over me, one thin layer at a time. And I’ve welcomed it in a way, because it gave me a break from all that constant upheaval that is very entertaining at the time, but ultimately gets me nowhere. I welcomed the break from that constant bargaining, negotiating conversation with Death.

I focused so exclusively on Getting Things Done… taking care of business… that I actually forgot I was eventually going to die. And I let my existential, experiential self “go to pot.”

But in the past couple of years, things have started to open up for me again. The difficulties I encountered put little stress fractures in my lacquer shell, and the light and air started to come in again. When I went through the MRI and EEG last winter and had to deal with all the fallout of some weird, unexplained neurological episodes, and I was getting to know what was REALLY going on inside me, despite my outward appearances (I bought my own cover), all of a sudden it occurred to me, “Oh my God, I’m going to die!” I really felt it. In my bones. To the marrow. The little voice in the back of my head got louder and louder and louder… and it wouldn’t go away.

I fought it at first, then I realized — “Hey, this is how I used to always feel! It didn’t keep me from living my life then, and it doesn’t need to stop me now.” In fact, if anything, in the past, it made it easier for me to live. Because I knew I had no guarantees, no promises of x-amount of time to get things done, no contracts made out in triplicate guaranteeing me such-and-such in life. I was free. Because I knew there was always a chance that everything would be over shortly, so I’d better make the most of my time and not worry so much about what other people had to say about it.

That’s kind of where I’ve been for the past several months. The voice is still there, still reminding me, still nudging at me. And I feel a great sense of urgency, a pressing need to Get On With It and make happen what I’m supposed to make happen. All around us, the world seethes and teems with life. All over — from the seas to the skies to the earth in between. It’s rich, it’s almost obscene in its opulent lushness. It’s full of every kind of energy you could ask for. And it’s all ours for the experiencing. Quelle luxe!

I just feel so blessed. I feel like we are ALL so blessed. The whole world is at our disposal, and it’s literally waiting for us to make our mark in it.

So, no matter what life is throwing at you these days, don’t hesitate to make your mark! Feel what you feel and do what you do. The rule-makers and politicians and bean-counters of thd world are lost in their own little dessicated microverses that are way too controlled and narrow-minded to sustain LIFE. I suspect they, too, have been lacquered over by life, and I do feel compassion for them. Maybe someday they will have the benefit of “awful” experiences that put cracks in their thick shells to let in the wind and rain and sunlight and make real growth possible. We all have the capability of letting that happen. We just need to let it.

So…

Look to the heavens. Look to the depths. Of course you’re going to slip and fall, now and then. You’re going to stumble and falter and wonder what the hell you were thinking when you decided to __________________. But all these things — good-bad-ugly-glorious — are the fecund compost of life that have worth and merit and a bittersweet beauteous bite to them when you quaf them from the waterfall of All That Is.

It just is. And it is Good. So go with it.

More talk about resiliency

There seems to be something in the air… Human resiliency in the face of trauma is on my radar again.

Over at the NICABM blog, there’s a post about Trauma Recovery with Tibetan Monks that I found really interesting. The video is a short blurb/(promo?) for a teleseminar with Dr. Michael Grodin who is the co-director of the Boston Center for Refugee Health and Human Rights. While I’m not a huge fan of using YouTube as an advertising vehicle (I like to watch videos that are self-contained “units” of really useful information — like some of the TBI education videos I’ve watched), I did find it interesting to hear about different sorts of therapy being used to work with survivors of torture, imprisonment, and other trauma.

I also found it informative to hear a little about what can happen to a Tibetan monk who is thrown in jail by the Chinese authorities. “Free Tibet” comes to mind…

Anyway, I’ve been thinking a great deal about my own resiliency, lately. Not only thinking, but living it. The conversations in the back of my head about what I need to do and how and why and when have given way to a more instinctual kind of flow. Even though I’m in a lot of pain, my ears have been ringing at an unbelievable rate, my balance is off, and I haven’t been sleeping as well as I’d like, that’s not stopping me. I’m just going with what seems right to do at the moment, these days, and doing what I can to keep up with my “self-maintenance” and mindful living, and it all seems to be working out pretty well. I’ve got projects in the works I can be proud of, and that I’m quite happy with. It’s good. Very cool things are happening, that are totally unexpected and unpredictable… but still good.

See, that’s the thing — I never know when things are going to turn around for me. Maybe I’ve been hit in the head too often to have a good sense for when things are going to get good again, or maybe it’s just the human condition to be unaware of the Good that lies just around the corner. Whatever the case may be, I’m constantly surprised by good fortune, and it saves my ass time and time again, as I’m slogging away… I just have to hang in there. Eventually, if I keep trying and keep going, chances are good that I’ll happen across an opportunity that will work in my favor.

You just never know…

Yes, times have been tough. Yes, I’ve gotten knocked around a great deal. Yes, I’ve lost a lot and have had to build back my life several times over. Yes, I was homeless at one time. Yes, I worked my way back from the street to a great job and a good profession and the kind of life I can be truly proud of. Yes, I got “body slammed” again, and yes, I cluelessly burned through hundreds of thousands of dollars I’d earned back… in record time. Yes, I’m struggling on a regular basis to find my footing. Yes, I have to work pretty hard at things that others find easy.

But you know what? That’s okay. I’m learning a lot in the process, and I feel smarter as a result –  tho’ whether I am smarter, is another issue ;). If nothing else, it builds character. I know that the idea of character is somewhat nebulous in this 21st century. In fact, it’s pretty much fallen off the radar — nowadays, the ticket to success seems to be popularity and marketability, not so much what you’re made of inside. But that’s not stopping me from developing my own life and my own character… even if it doesn’t make me instantly popular or famous.

Ultimately, what matters most is not what others think of me, but what I think of myself… and the real results of my life.

That’s what I’m focusing on.

Now, back to work…

The perils of pseudo-psychological problems

Something has occurred to me repeatedly, over the past month, as my sleeping habits have improved. Namely, that many of the “mental health” issues I’ve been experiencing over the past several years, have had a distinctly physiological component to them. In fact, at the risk of sounding radical, presumptuous, and heretical – though I’m seldom reluctant to be just that 😉 – I suspect that a ton of my “psychological” issues have actually been physical ones.

I’m sure I’m going to really piss off some of the psychotherapists in the room by saying this, but I have to say that catching up on my sleep and figuring out how to get a full night’s sleep more than one night in a row, has done more for my mental health than two years of therapy.

And no, I did not have a bad therapist. They were great – awesome – and they really helped me a great deal, if only by sitting there and not making fun of me when I talked about this and that.

But let me tell you – as a TBI survivor who had/has a whole raft of physical ailments (chronic pain, insomnia, sensory hypersensitivities, weight fluctuations, heart palpitations, vertigo, tinnitus, and more…), just living with all those issues can really mess with your head. And as long as only the symptoms of my physical distress were being addressed, not much moved.

I did get in touch with my feelings. That’s for sure. I figured out that I actually mattered, and that it was important for me to take care of my own health and well-being, not constantly do the martyr-hero thing and sacrifice my own safety for the sake of others. I had space to learn to look at myself and my life through a less negatively critical eye and consider that maybe, just maybe, I had a right to do more that survive in life. I had/have a right to thrive.

But one of the things I really got in touch with was the fact that my physical well-being is a huge contributor to (and predictor of) how well my mental well-being holds up. When I’m tired and in pain and weak, my ears are ringing like the dickens, and my head spins wildly and I feel like I’m going to fall over every time I move, it’s pretty damned difficult to maintain a positive mental outlook and count my blessings. When I’m not feeling well physically, the chances of me feeling well mentally and emotionally decrease exponentially.

There are some people who manage to keep a cheery, chipper outlook, despite significant physical issues. I’m usually one of those  people, and I usually manage to not let my physical problems bother me. But when I haven’t had enough sleep for weeks and months on end, chances are pretty good that I’m going to feel depressed, anxious, irritable, low — and show other signs of clinical depression.

Okay, so here’s the thing — when I was in therapy with my prior therapist, they repeatedly came back to the suspicion that I was depressed. They asked me a number of times if I thought I was depressed, and if I’d said “Yes,” I’m sure they would have followed up on that, however a therapist does that. And they probably would have plumbed the depths, looking for what it was that made me depressed — some repressed past trauma, some childhood violation, some incident that I’d blocked out to keep from being unhappy.

And lots of talk would probably have ensued. Talk, talk, and more talk.

Now, talking is all very well and good, but as Belleruth Naparstek said at a conference I once attended (and I believe she’s said in her book “Invisible Heroes”), sometimes talking does more harm than good, by dredging up old traumas and forcing you to relive them. That can be very unpleasant, as I’m sure everyone is aware. And for me it’s really problematic, because I prefer to dwell on problems with a solution in mind, and if I’m dwelling on a past incident which cannot be changed (it’s already over and done), I get even more agitated and irate over it.

Some people might say that I’m just not willing to deal with the emotional fallout of misfortune, but I say I’m a solutions-oriented individual and the main reason I think about things, is so that I can change them, so why in the hell would I spend all this time thinking about stuff that cannot be changed? The therapists in the room who would say I’m emotionally “blocked” would probably try to treat me… with more talking about shit that makes no sense for me to talk about.

Make no mistake — I’m not at all reluctant to discuss misfortunes I’ve experienced in the past. But any discussion that takes place with me, has to be about devising solutions and coping mechanisms for the problems I have as a result. I’ve had some really shitty things happen to me, but you know what? It’s over, and I’ve managed to forgive just about everybody in my past for their shortcomings… even myself. The problem is not that I’m represssed. It’s that people want to process the wrong type of stuff with me — problems, problems, and more problems — and my reluctance to discuss stuff I’ve already been through a thousand times in my head is interpreted as repression or avoidance or some other psychological/emotional impairment.

What’s more, when pressed to explore the nether regions of my soul with talk therapy, I tend to get turned around. As good as I am at writing, I’m can be kind of pathetic when it comes to spoken conversation. I have an intensely visual mind, which follows conversations and spoken communication with series’ of images that are like an associational, disjointed movie in my head. I literally see pictures of what people are talking about, and when people start talking about things for which I have no picture — or I have several of them to choose from — it takes me a while to catch up and keep up. It’s not that I’m stupid. Or that I’m slow. I’m just incredibly visual in my own mind, when it comes to spoken language, and visual processing doesn’t lend itself as well to spontaneous conversation.

So, when I’m talking to someone about what’s going on with me, and they start talking about things that aren’t immediately famliar to me — or that I’m not expecting them to talk about — it’s really easy for me to get agitated and introveted. I need time to catch up. I need time to keep up. I need time to translate their words into pictures and process the information visually, so that I can make sense of what they’re saying to me. But I don’t always have that much time, and over the course of my life, I’ve gotten into the bad-but-pragmatic habit of just pretending I know what’s going on, while making mental notes in the back of my mind about what was just said, so I can go back to it later and rethink it all and hopefully make sense of things.

The problem is, in a therapeutic situation where I’m supposed to be making some sort of progress and addressing issues, this really works against me. It tends to make me look reticent and/or like I’m deliberately withholding. I’m not — I’m just trying to process the information and make sense of it. Believe me, if I could answer immediately like other people, I would. But my brain just doesn’t work that way.

I also tend to get really frustrated with myself and get agitated, which looks like I’m uncomfortable talking about certain things. It’s not that  I don’t want to let other people in. I do — more than I can say. But I get so turned around in my head, and I get so upset with myself for not being able to follow, that I start to flail and spin and then shut down. I feel like I’m getting backed into a corner, and I get revved… and by the end of the session, I look like a totally basket case who needs to spend years sitting across the room from someone, before I can get in touch with my feelings.

This sucks on so many levels, I can’t even begin to tell you. The worst thing of all is having someone who is supposedly trained and experienced in these matters misunderstanding, miscalculating, misdiagnosing, and mis-treating conditions which don’t even exist the way they think they do. On the surface, you’re exhibiting classic signs of clinical depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, but underneath it all you’re struggling for words that will explain exactly what is going on with you, and why you’re acting the way you do. And the bitch of it is, because you’re the (sick) client and they are the (trained, experienced, licensed) therapist, you’re not in a position to be taken totally seriously when you do manage to tell them a little bit about what’s up with you. ‘Cause they think you’re seriously mentally ill and you can’t possibly know what your real problems are.

After all, you probably have no recollection of what that nasty-ass uncle did to you as a toddler when your mother’s back was turned.

It’s a problem. I hear plenty of stories about therapists who don’t know  what they’re doing… as well as those who know very well what they’re up to but have no scruples or morals. I hear plenty of tales about over-prescription of medications, as well as  misdiagnosis of mental health issues that have more to do with fundamental differences of information processing, than pathology. The mental health profession has been pathologizing the diversity of human experience for as long as it’s been around — perhaps that’s a hallmark of any helping/caring profession that’s trying to get on its feet. Applying labels like “hysterical” or “deviant” or “sick” to people who are just different from the norm is a time-honored tradition in the mental health field, so there are no surprises there. But it’s a problem that’s been shifting and changing over the past 30 years, and that’s a good thing.

Now, if I can figure out a way to explain to my new therapist the nature and degree of my physical issues, so they can see my issues in light of my insomnia, pain, and physical sensitivities… and not spend an inordinate amount of time focusing exclusively on my past emotional trauma, that will be a good thing.

Beyond the Invisible – TBI Video for and about Military Veterans

I just learned about a 4-part series about TBI from the Brain Injury Association of NY Military Veterans Project. Check it out – it’s great!

Beyond the Invisible

Part 1 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G5eWersQdRw&feature=related

Part 2 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TwsGzRLTRqY&feature=related

Part 3 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ADC93aoVkP8&feature=related

Part 4 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7QBnACJ7eAQ&feature=related

Yet more thoughts on TBI and mental illness

This morning (6/9/9), I took a gander at the ways people have been finding their ways to this blog since I first started it over a year ago.

  • 38 people got here by looking for info about TBI/brains and anger/rage
  • 86 got here just searching on tbi
  • 156 got here by searching for info on interviewing
  • 39 people got here by searching for brain info
  • 225 people found their ways here by searching on tbi and mental illness

Apparently, it’s something people are concerned about.

And so am I.

I’m worried. Really, really worried. Because this society seems all too eager to label people “mentally ill” when they really have logistical problems — it’s not necessarily that they aren’t thinking properly, ’cause of some inner psychological conflict going on — it’s that they can’t think properly, ’cause their brains have been rattled or somehow impacted.

And our society seems all too eager to prescribe medicines for psychological conditions — meds which may actually exacerbate the issues at hand.

For instance, as I understand it, the irritability and temper flares that come with TBI are often due to a “constant inner restlessness” that takes up residence in your head after a brain injury. That constant restlessness can be directly related to something called “tonic arousal” which (as I understand it) has to do with how awake your brain is. After TBI, certain functions slow down — processing slows down, connections that were once intact are now broken, so it takes the brain longer to sort things out. And with that slowness comes a decrease in tonic arousal… which also can lead to attention difficulties… which can feed into all sorts of problems that can make you nuts and drive you to distraction.

TBI >>> less tonic arousal >>> increased irritability >>> more meltdowns, rage, blow-ups, etc.

Now, let’s say some doctor or psychiatrist gets hold of a TBI survivor and diagnoses them with some anxiety-related condition, or some other “psychological” dysfunction. Let’s say the attending caretaker prescribes one of those “downregulators” that slows down the processes that can feed into manic/anxiety type experiences. What do you get when you downregulate someone who’s already struggling to keep up? Decreased tonic arousal. Which can mean more irritability, more temper flares, more rage, more meltdowns… possibly increased violent acting out? Maybe?

Downregulating meds >>> even less tonic arousal >>> even more increased irritability >>> more and more and more meltdowns, rage, blow-ups, etc.

I’m not a doctor, but I don’t think you need to be one, to get this connection. Maybe not being a doctor helps you see it all the clearer, without the long-term effects of that sleep-deprived-traumatized-resident fog that lots of docs get hammered by when they first start practicing.

This really worries me — had I mentioned that?

And given how many people sustain TBIs each year, not to mention how many vets are returning from Iraq and Afghanistan with TBI’s and PTSD, etc., it really opens the door to a lot of crappy medicine and pain for the families and friends of the folks who have given their very brains in service to this country.

I think the only thing we can hope to do is educate people — not so much the doctors, because how many of them are listening? It’s about educating “the people” — the patients who look high and low for help (if they ever figure out that they need — and can get) help. Making sure people have access to truthful and accurate and independent information — and giving them easy and useful ways to wield that info as they defend themselves from the quacks of the world, not to mention Big Pharma.

Ultimately, it is up to each and every one of us to fend for ourselves, but a little help would be nice, now and then…

A Perilous Relief – The Physical Backdrop(s) of My Risk-Taking Behavior(s)

At the risk of sounding like I’m sitting around feeling sorry for myself, let me tell you about my physical experience. I don’t want pity, I don’t want clucking of tongues, I don’t want you to feel sorry for me. This is just my experience, and I’ve acclimated to it over the years. But I’d be lying, if I told you it’s easy…

To fully appreciate just how my risk-taking and danger-seeking constitute attempts to soothe my overworked physical/mental/emotional system, you’d have to understand just how anxious, sensorily overloaded, and painfully sensitive I tend to be. And you’d have to understand the impact that repeated injuries, including head injuries, have had on my everyday life. I have, in fact, sustained numerous mild traumatic brain injuries since age 7, the experience of which is consistent with my sensory and other physical issues. (See http://www.traumaticbraininjury.com/content/symptoms/mildtbisymptoms.html for a list of mild tbi symptoms.)

All my life, I have had issues with pain and handling sensory input. As a child, I had a hard time differentiating between different sounds, but at the same time, my hearing was very sensitive. I was very attuned to fine details, and I was highly distractable. I experienced touch as pain, which caused many forms of regular human contact to be uncomfortable, even painful for me. I was not very limber, I had trouble touching my toes, and doing exercises like somersaults was difficult. Cartwheels were out of the question. I was an active child, and I loved to climb and play and join in with games, but my coordination wasn’t always the best, and I was often picked last for team games in school.

I loved to play sports, but I didn’t have a very broad range of abilities. For example, I loved to play softball. I loved it so much, that I wanted to become a professional softball player, when I grew up. Baseball didn’t appeal to me, because having a small, white object hurled at me scared the bejesus out of me. I had a hard time judging distance and speed, and the larger, softer softball wasn’t nearly as frightening to me.

There were a couple of problems with my pro ballplayer aspirations, though. The first was, I had a hard time catching fly balls. When my dad would practice with me and hit flies to me, I couldn’t judge the distance to the ball, or I shrank away from it in fear. My preference was to let the ball drop and then pick it up and throw it to another player. But that kind of choice-making in a serious ball game would have cost my team dearly.

Playing the outfield was not an option for me.

Sliding was out of the question. I was to hesitant and too gawky to do it very well. And the pain that came afterwards was inhibitive, whenever I considered sliding.

I couldn’t react quickly enough on the spot to play shortstop.

My coordination issues kept me from being a very good baseman. My reaction time wasn’t consistent, and my ability to catch and tag wasn’t very good. I wanted to play shortstop, but it made me too nervous, and I couldn’t think and react quickly enough to make a very good player at that position.

I made up for all this by throwing myself wholeheartedly into the small range of activities I could do well. I had too much trouble with fielding and reacting quickly to be an all-round good player. What I could do, was play third base, hit, and be a good team captain. Third base was a kind of in-between position that was half-baseman and half shortstop, that let me be in the infield, but in a more marginal position. I was a pretty decent batter, and I also learned I could switch hit. I’m right-handed, so I always thought that I should bat right-handed. But I actually found that I was better able to bat left-handed. It just felt so much more natural to me. Most of all, I was a good team leader — a captain who led by the example of just throwing myself into the game and doing my best at any and all times, even if I messed up, now and then. I think, if anything, my spirit helped the team more than any amount of technical skill.

But still, it wasn’t easy to come to terms with the fact that I just didn’t have what it took to become a professional softball player.

When I was young, there wasn’t really anything like a diagnosis of sensory integration dysfunction or sensory perception disorders, and attentional challenges weren’t yet on the radar. All I know/knew was, I was immersed in a seething cauldron of sensory input and there was really no escape.

I’d like to say things got better when I grew up, but I can’t say that’s so. All I can say is, I’ve gotten used to these problems, which doesn’t make me very happy, actually. But there it is.

Below is a run-down of the persistent physical issues I’ve had to deal with most of my life, and that still plague me intermittently. I’ve tried to be as thorough as possible, so you can get an idea of the scope and intensity of my “sensory landscape.” These issues can range from mild to extreme, and they manifest with varying degrees of frequency. I do not experience all of them simultaneously, but many can appear concurrent with others.

Ringing in my ears (tinnitus)

I have a constant ringing in my ears. I’ve had this as long as I can remember. It used to drive me crazy as a teenager, but eventually I got used to it. It’s a high-pitched whine, not so much ringing — a very thin, reedy, penetrating whine “over” several other deeper tones. It rarely goes away. If there’s no ringing when I wake up, it usually starts by mid-morning. It’s worse when I’m tired and/or stressed and/or have allergies. It’s better when I’m rested.

Vertigo, Dizzy-ness, Light-headedness

I have occasional feelings of being “woozy” and/or losing my balance suddenly. Sometimes it can last for a day or more. Sometimes, when it’s really bad, it lasts for days — nearly a week, in the past. I have to be very careful that I don’t fall, when it’s particularly bad. Holding onto things, keeping myself rigidly upright and intently focusing my attention on something in front of me helps. Tactile activities help me focus — holding onto things, making contact with things around me, like fabrics and curtains, arms of chair, objects held in my hand. It’s much worse when I am tired, and when I have allergies, it’s worse. It gets better when I’m rested, but it usually takes at least a day or so to clear up, even when I am rested.

Balance (Vestibular) details (when they’re at their most extreme)

When I’m experiencing “vestibular challenges,” the whole world spins wildly around me… swaying and shifting. Every time I move, no matter how small the motion, I feel like I’m going to fall over. I cannot move my head without being overwhelmed by waves of nausea that wash over me in progressive swells. When I turn my head this way or that — I never know when, or which way — there is a swooshing sound in my ears that is sometimes accompanied by pressure and pain. My ears hurt me with a dull ache that’s sharp at the center… like thick sticks that have small points being pressed into my eardrums. My stomach lurches, and my head pounds with a sick headache. A whining, whistling, high-pitched roar fills my ears, and through the intense ringing, I hear muffled sounds that annoy me with distraction. Even when I stop and hold still, the sense of imbalance continues, like a bucket of water that’s been swung to and fro, sloshing back and forth for a while, even after it’s set down on a level surface.

Going about my everyday business, I sometimes have a sudden sense of falling that eclipses and overrides all other sensory input in my system. The room spins, my legs become weak, and my head swirls in sickening waves of disequilibrium. The walls seem to move before my very eyes, the floor rolls beneath me, and my body feels like it’s swaying. For as long as the feeling lasts, I cannot think, I cannot talk, I cannot react to anything around me. I cannot hear or see much of anything around me. I’m dimly aware that there are objects or people nearby, but they don’t register. I’m faintly aware that people are talking to me, but I cannot respond immediately. All I can do, is try to right myself, try not to fall, try to fight back the waves of sickening vertigo, and hang on, till the nausea passes.

My condition does not seem to respond to “standard treatments”. I’ve tried ear drops and anti-vertigo medications, and they did nothing for me. I also wish I could just write this off as a simple balance issue and have that suffice. But there’s a whole lot more to my situation, than being off-balance. Vestibular issues are just the beginning.

Coordinated Balance (“Proprioceptive?”) Issues

I also have issues with sensing where my body is in relation to the world around me (“proprioceptive” issues). These tend to kick in most intensely when I’m off-balance. I cannot feel where my body is in relation to things around me, and I bump into objects all the time — corners of tables, sides of counters, chairs I’m passing… I also knock things off flat surfaces, if they are too close to the edge. I have a hard time gauging how quickly my body is moving in any one direction, which can cause me to misjudge distances and be uncoordinated. I fumble at picking up objects, I drop things I’m holding, and I tend to have trouble judging distances between myself and others. I also inadvertently bump or hit people when I’m just trying to reach out to them or move past them. When I’m trying to keep my balance, I tend to (for lack of a better word) “proprioceptively overreact,” which makes me either bump into things and people around me or shy away from them abruptly, neither of which is interpersonally optimal.

Hearing

My hearing is also affected by my simply not being able to pay attention to anything but staying upright and not running into things. I can be so intent on trying to stay balanced, that I don’t hear anything around me immediately. I’ll hear things, but they don’t immediately register. And when they do register, I’m often so far behind in figuring out what’s going on, I get the message turned around and am not successful in responding to what I’m hearing right away. When I’m really struggling to navigate contact with the world around me, it can take a few minutes for sounds to sink in and be processed in my brain. I hear them, but I don’t process them immediately. This can be a problem when someone is talking to me. I won’t hear them for a few seconds, and then when I do hear them, I am so busy trying to figure out what they just said to me that I miss what I am able to hear. This is less than optimal.

One of the most annoying and disorienting auditory aspects of my bad days is the whooshing sound, which comes and goes when I’m “off” — sometimes quickly, sometimes gradually. I can rarely predict when it’s going to happen (although during allergy season it is usually more pronounced). It often takes me by surprise and thoroughly distracts me from what I’m doing. I’m usually so caught up in going about my daily business, I don’t notice the dull roar or the achy pressure or even the whooshing sound until it’s unmistakable. And when I finally hear this whooshing sound, I tend to feel nauseous and dizzy. I seem to associate it with feeling lightheaded and sick on my stomach, and whenever I hear it — whether I’m nauseous and dizzy or not — I cringe. I freeze. My rest of body seems to remember what it feels like to hear that whooshing sound, and it reacts accordingly.

Sight

My vision can be affected, too. When I’m off-balance, and I’m not well in-touch with the world around me, my vision gets “re-assigned” to the task of helping me keep my balance. It’s hard to describe, but when I’m “off,” I can visually detect things around me, but I don’t readily process what that means. It’s like with my hearing — I know I’m seeing something, but my brain is too busy trying to figure out how to just keep steady and parse out all the input coming in, to interpret what that something I’m seeing is.

Probably the best quick example I can give of this, is from a time when I was driving through a parking lot, and I literally didn’t see another driver, who nearly hit me, and I didn’t hear him honking his horn at me, until I was nearly out of the parking lot. I was at an office supplies store, and I’d just bought myself a new headset for my cell phone, so I could drive hands-free and still talk on the phone. I try to avoid talking on the cell phone while I drive, but I was hoping that a headset might let me at least be able to accept incoming calls without being a hazard to other drivers.

I sat in my parked car for a few minutes, figuring out how to put the headset together, then I placed it on my head, positioned the mic in front of my mouth, and slowly pulled out into the parking lot. As I was rolling towards the exit, I noticed that a car was pulling out of a side lane just ahead of me. The headset felt like it was slipping off my head, and the microphone wasn’t staying in front of my mouth. My attention was focused intently on the feel of the headset on my head and the mic at my mouth.

As though in slow motion, I saw the front of the other car inch out into my path. I didn’t slow down, but continued to drive towards the exit. The headset felt strange on my head, and I could hardly think of anything but keeping my head straight. The front the other car was rapidly approaching the driver’s side front fender of my own vehicle, but I continued to drive on. I didn’t veer, I didn’t slow down, I didn’t speed up. I didn’t react at all — I just drove on. Only dimly was I aware that I had barely slipped past the front of the other car and avoided a collision. It never occurred to me that I should react in some way. It never occurred to me that I should interact with the other car.

As I continued to coast towards the exit, I could hear a beeping in the distance. The headset on my head continued to bother me with its pressure on my one ear and the feel of the microphone near the side of my cheek. The mic wasn’t pressing against my skin, but I was keenly aware of its proximity. I really felt like I was losing my balance, and I held my head absolutely still to keep the apparatus properly positioned. The beeping continued, and I wondered if someone’s car alarm had gone off. But the sound wasn’t rhythmic or regular, so it must have come from somewhere else.

I looked in my rear-view mirror, and I saw driver of the car I’d narrowly missed yelling and beeping his horn at me and wildly gesticulating, pointing at his head. At first, it didn’t sink in, that he was communicating with me, but when I looked up again, I realized that his behavior was directed at me. And he was furious. The headset kept slipping off the side of my head, ever so slightly, but enough to distract me.

Realizing what was going on around me, at last, I tore it off my head and threw it on the passenger seat beside me. When the headset was off, it was as though the lights went on in a dark room, and someone suddenly turned up the volume on life all around me. I could suddenly see. I could suddenly hear. Suddenly, I wasn’t sitting in an enclosed cell with a headset on, I was driving a car in a parking lot. I got out of the parking lot as quickly as I could, merged into traffic, and went back to work, shaken but grateful that I hadn’t done any damage.

I haven’t used that headset at all, since I bought it.

My vision and hearing aren’t the only senses that get “whacked” when I’m out of sync. My taste and smell do, too. My sense of smell tends to be either all-on, or all-off. It’s very rare that I smell something “normally” and can take deep breaths of scents, like perfumes or foods. If I get too strong a whiff of something, it makes my head spin and really overloads me. And if I’m already off balance, or I’m not connecting well with the world around me, my sense of smell sometimes completely turns off. My sense of taste is even less predictable. It’s muted and vague, and I often judge the foods I like more by their texture, than by their taste.

Touch – Pain

My sense of touch is quite variable — like my sense of smell, either it’s all-on, or it’s all-off. I can literally slam into things, and never feel the impact… sometimes I don’t know I slammed into something until I see the bruises on my leg the next day. But my sense of touch in my hands is very active. When I’m feeling nervous or agitated, running my hands over objects — like the interior upholstery and surfaces of my nephew’s new BMW — is very soothing for me. I’ve always loved satiny fabrics, and when I was a kid, I couldn’t fall asleep unless I rubbed the satin edge of my blanket. I rubbed that smooth, soothing edge so long and so often, I wore a hole in it!

On the other hand, I can experience a lot of tactile discomfort. A simple human touch can feel like a blow to me, and when people put their hand on my arm, sometimes it feels like they’re smacking me. Hard. It’s very strange and difficult to describe, and it makes me very uncomfortable to talk about it, but I experience pain and discomfort from things like clothing, hugs, harmless social touches, and jewelry. I don’t wear any bracelets or extra rings or necklaces, or even a watch, because the contact tends to be very uncomfortable — and distracting — for me.

There are a number of different kinds of tactile discomfort I experience. They are not like muscular pain, but are very much on the surface and localized in my skin surface. Here are some details and descriptions:

Burning – It feels like being burned with a hot coal(s), like embers are laid on top of my skin and are burning down through to the bone. This occurs often on my upper arms and across my shoulders and back. It’s usually worse when I’m tired or have a lot of stimuli coming in on me, and its origin is internal in nature (I’ll call it “autonomic”).

Twisting – It feels like I’m having my skin twisted by two hands having a firm grip on my skin, and twisting in opposite directions (like the “Indian burns” we kids used to give each other). It is mostly on my outer forearms and wrists, and it’s worse when I’m tired or stressed. (Autonomic)

Healing burn – It feels like having second-degree burns that are healing under my skin – not on the surface, not down at the bone, but just under the surface of my skin. This occurs mostly on my outer forearms and wrists, and it’s aggravated by having long sleeves. It’s usually worse when I’m tired or have a lot going on around me. (Autonomic)

Chafing – It feels like being rubbed by by a rough surface – either a piece of rough material, or in some cases, a surface that is a little sticky or ‘grippy’ and pulls my skin a little as it rubs. Some people talk about “sandpaper” type of pain, and this might be close to it, but it’s not exactly. It sometimes feels like a moist, tacky texture being rubbed across my skin. I experience this mostly on the tops of my thighs, aggravated by my slacks. Sometimes I feel it on my arms, and it’s aggravated by the touch of light clothing. (Autonomic)

Prickling – This feels like being jabbed with little tiny pins over an extended area. It’s somewhat similar to “sandpaper” type of pain, but not exactly. It sometimes feels like coarse sandpaper against my skin — not rubbed across it, but held in place, so it irritates me with its presence, but it doesn’t rake. I usually experience this when my clothing brushes my forearms and wrists, also happens without prompting on my upper arms and across my shoulders. (Autonomic)

Blistering – It feels like my skin is blistering and cracking, like paint cracking in the sun, or my lips cracking from being chapped. It usually happens when I am just lying still and trying to relax, like when I’m in bed and trying to sleep. The more I relax and just breathe, the more my skin feels like it’s blistering and cracking and peeling. It happens when my skin is exposed to the air and doesn’t have anything over top of it. It’s much worse when I am tired, but it can happen pretty much anytime. It often takes me by surprise. (Autonomic)

Brushing/Raking – This feels like having my skin brushed/raked/ stroked with a metal-bristle hair brush – the sharp ends pulled across my skin, not pressed in really deeply, but just on the surface, where it irritates and I can’t get away from it. I usually feel this on the tops of my thighs — when my pants brush against my skin lightly. It’s not startlingly painful, but it does hurt. (Autonomic)

Smacking – This feels like being hit hard with an open hand or broad surface – and then the pain scatters out across my skin, as though it were a campfire that had something land in it, and the coals and sparks scattered all around it. It usually happens when someone touches me for a few minutes (an short but extended period of time). Like when my partner put their hand on my forearm when we were driving down to visit family for Christmas. They just laid their hand on my forearm affectionately. It really hurt, and I could feel the pain spreading out around where their hand lay on my forearm. The pain continued, even after they took their hand away. (This is an interactive type of pain, brought on by human contact.)

Banging – This feels like being struck with a blunt instrument – and then the impact reverberates throughout my body. This usually occurs when someone touches me briefly without warning, often in casual conversation, like when my brother-in-law was talking to me at a restaurant one Christmas, and he was harmlessly touching my arm (in a friendly, appropriately affectionate way). This also happens when someone tries to hug me. I have also experienced this when my partner was checking me over for ticks, and they touched the backs of my legs, near my knees. The pressure was very light, but it felt like they were poking me very hard with a blunt object. (Interactive).

Please keep in mind that (thankfully) not all of these types of pain happen simultaneously, and they tend to vary. From one minute to the next, I can go from a relatively pain-free state, to waves of strong physical discomfort. I can be 75% fine one day, and be 15% fine, the next. One type of clothing can be unbearable for me, while others are benign, even pleasurable. And a person’s sudden touch can be excruciating one day, while the next, it can be welcome and enjoyable. “Pain” can also be relative, varying from mildly uncomfortable to downright agonizing. But I differentiate it from “discomfort” in that its degree is different.

Discomfort is something I can deal with, but pain is something that every fiber of my being seeks to escape. An itch is uncomfortable for me. Fabric sensitivity, even at its slightest, feels painful to me. It’s not just discomfort, which to me to me is just annoying and transitory. It’s pain.

My autonomic pain seems to be exacerbated by the qualities of the things I contact — the chemical makeup of fabrics, the quality of light and sound around me, the intensity of the sensation I have (such as the strength of pressure on my skin from the cell phone headset). It tends to get worse, also, when I’m over-tired or I’ve got a lot of different sensory input to process. I haven’t taken the time to figure out what kinds of textiles or materials give me the most trouble. Some days, everything gives me a lot of trouble. I just kind of go with it, and see how I’m doing, where I’m at, and I adjust accordingly.

My interactive pain tends to be exacerbated and complicated by my vestibular and proprioceptive issues. Being unable to gauge distances from people who are reaching out to touch me (no matter how appropriately), makes it difficult to A) prepare myself for their contact, or B) react appropriately. It is difficult for me to receive hugs from friends and loved-ones when my sensory issues are kicking in, and this contributes to my social awkwardness. I tend to stiffen and get tense, which actually makes the experience worse for everyone — for me, because it heightens my agitation, and for them, because they sense a reluctance from me that is physical rather than emotional or interpersonal, and their contact tends to become a bit more clumsy. Stress and strain tend to sharpen my pain, so when my vestibular and proprioceptive issues are acting up, the startling experience of a sudden physical contact can make even a simple touch extremely painful.

The different types of pain I experience can be helped by things like sleep, immobility, keeping away from the source of irritation, movement, stretching, steering clear of people and physical contact, preparing for physical contact with others, or just distracting myself from the sensation by some sort of activity. Analgesics like Advil are not very effective, although they do sometimes take the edge off things. A hot shower can be very relaxing, and swimming in a heated pool is probably the thing that helps me the most. Depending on the type of pain, and how well I’m rested, sometimes relaxing and being immobile makes it worse. Other times, it makes it better. It all depends how I’m feeling at the time, and how well I can redirect my attention to things other than the pain. I haven’t been able to figure out exactly how best to address this. I usually just think about something else and keep myself busy to keep my mind off it, as there’s really no escaping it, when the pain is in “full swing”.

Touch – Insensitivity

One of the other tactile issues I experience is on the extreme opposite end of the spectrum — lack of sensation. When I’m off balance, and my proprioceptive sense is diminished, I tend to run into things, but I often don’t feel it right away. I sometimes notice a sharp shooting pain when I bump into things, but the sensation disappears immediately, and I won’t know how badly I’ve bruised myself till later. I have also accidentally cut myself and not felt it until some time later. At times, when I have really cut myself deeply, or I’ve bumped myself hard enough to get a deep bruise, I’ve been so intensely focused on what I was doing at the time, I hardly noticed the pain and only realized I’d hurt myself when I felt the blood or saw the bruise later.

I suspect this may have something to do with adrenaline — my adrenaline is pumping so hard, at times, as I try to keep myself together, that it seems to numb me to the pain. I’m not a doctor and I don’t know nearly enough about human physiology, but my experience when I unwittingly injure myself is very similar to when I was injured while playing sports — I’d be so intent on the game and so “adrenalized” that I would hardly notice the pain. Again, I’m no doctor, but that’s how I experience it.


A Perilous Relief – Table of Contents

MTBI and mental health

I’ve been thinking a lot about how TBI (especially MBTI) can either masquerade as mental illness… or lead to it. Not being a psychotherapist, I can’t speak to the intimate details of what makes a person mentally ill, but being a multiple MTBI survivor, I can speak to my own experiences.

In my recent post The Disordered Life and the Need for Psychotherapy, I talked a bit about how my past therapy experience was perhaps not the most effective for me — or the most appropriate. And now I’m starting to think that maybe it did me more harm than good, in some respects. That constant plumbing the depths of my soul, looking for things to explore… well, that frankly wasn’t often a very productive experience. I’d end up in tears, 24 hours later, and I’d be turned around for days, confused about things and off-balance in my life.

Here are some more thoughts regarding the mention over at Get Real Results. Their text is in bold, mine is plain.

Many people who enter traditional psychodynamic psychotherapy do so because they are dissatisfied with their lives.

I got into therapy, because I was having an incredibly difficult time dealing with being a caregiver for a family member who had developed disabling health problems. They had been going slowly but steadily downhill for a while, their health problems worsening without being really addressed. They frankly refused to see a doctor for their problems. They wouldn’t even admit that there was a problem. I had tried to soldier through with them, stick with them, no matter what, and be loyal and helpful and stabilizing. But ultimately, they ended up in the hospital, where they were properly diagnosed and put on a recovery regimen. They were unable to do much of anything for themself, so I took time off from work and helped them get back on their feet. During that time, I was the only caregiver for them, and due to circumstances that are way too complicated to go into here, I couldn’t ask friends of family for help. Only a few were available to me, and then in a very limited capacity. Basically, I was holding the fort down for the two of us, and I was getting increasingly frayed… and incapable of dealing with the situation in a productive manner. My temper got shorter and shorter and increasingly explosive, I was melting down (in private), occassionally self-injuring to relieve the internal pressure, and becoming more and more PTSD-y. It was just not good. I was getting worse by the week, and it was starting to get dicey for the person I was supposed to be caring for. I knew I was supposed to be doing better than I was, and I couldn’t figure out why I was so fragile and inept and having such a terrible time of things. A friend pushed for me to get into therapy, and they found me a seasoned therapist they thought would be a good match. I decided to give it a try.

Their dissatisfaction may be due to being unsure of themselves, goals that are not clear, inability to accomplish what they want, unsatisfying relationships, anger or fear, or they are depressed.

I really didn’t know what was going on with me. I was having a hell of a time understanding what the doctors were telling me, remembering the info I was getting, and if I hadn’t had us all on a very strict schedule each day, with extra attention paid to nutrition and exercise and the most  basic of needs, we all probably would have spun wildly out of control. Friends who knew about what was  going on would would ask me what I needed, but I had no idea. They would try to talk to me about the situation and give me some support, but I coudn’t seem to access anything useful to tell them. I could discuss high-level things like medical research. I could talk about basic stuff like eating plans. But when it came to regular human interaction and talking about what was going on with me, I was at a complete and total loss. People would ask me what I needed from them, and I couldn’t answer. I literally didn’t know. All I knew was, I was locked on target to keep everyone in the household going, and keep my care-take-ee on the road to recovery.

Hoping to find out what was going on, I went into therapy. I really didn’t know what to expect. I had tried therapy years before, and it ended badly. What I did know was that I was wearing thin, I was melting down, I was not holding up well, and I didn’t know why. I needed someone to help me figure it out — and hopefully address it.

Psychotherapy offers them a chance to explore their feelings and past, uncover and resolve the conflicts that interfere with their lives, vent their frustrations, and get on with their lives.

Oh, yes… the exploration of the past… My therapist was really into that. They wanted to know what my parents were like, what they’d done that was awful, what my childhood environment was like, etc. Granted, my early childhood was not easy — I didn’t see much of my parents in my early years, I was in childcare during most of my waking hours, and when I did see my parents in the evenings or on the weekends, they were busy working around the house or they were occupied with concerns other than me. And the times when I did interact with them, I often had troubles. We would start out pretty good, then eventually things would go south, and I’d end up melting down or being disciplined for something I’d done. I had a lot of sensory issues when I was a kid — touch felt like pain a lot of times, and I had a hard time hearing and understanding what people were saying to me — so the “easy” times were a bit more complicated than one might expect.

Anyway, my therapist apparently had a lot of interesting material to work with, ’cause my childhood as I reported it was such a tangled mess. And my teen years and early adulthood weren’t much more straightforward.  Let’s just say I’ve had an eventful life. A non-standard life. A unique experience. I often got the feeling, during our sessions, that they were trying to uncover something really awful that would explain why I was such a wreck.

I have to say, I wasn’t always comfortable with that dynamic. It seemed to me that they were making some assumptions that just didn’t “sit right” with me. Looking back honestly and truthfully — and I’m not afraid to look at bad things that have happened, to me (even though I’m not usually comfortable talking about them with others) — I just couldn’t find any evidence of the kinds of abuse that are usually associated with intense PTSD. Sure, there’s that whole “repressed memory” thing, but I’m sorry, I just wasn’t feeling it. My diagnostic neuropsychologist concurred (on their own steam) that the difficulties I face are not psychological in origin, rather TBI-related, and even before I started the neuropsych testing, I had a strong, undeniable sense that the problems I was having with keeping up with everything around me were NOT just about stress, were not just about an unhappy childhood, were NOT based in psychological problems, but had some other origin. And I had to figure out what that was.

I suspect that hard-core psychiatric/psychological “team members” are going to turn their noses up at this, but you have to understand — I have spent 30-some years specializing in exploring the innermost recesses of my psyche. I’ve got countless journals filled with self-exploration to prove it. I’ve peered into dark corners on a daily basis for decades, and I’m not afraid to confront my demons. Seriously. I’m not. And when I took a long, hard look at the chronology of my childhood and teen years and early adulthood… and up to the present time… and I compared it with the chronology of my regular-functioning siblings… and I compared how I wanted (and tried) to  behave and experience life against how things actually turned out, well it was pretty damned clear to me that there was more than psychology at work.

There had to be a logistical, systemic issue at hand that hadn’t been identified or dealt with. My difficulties stemmed — it was pretty clear to me — NOT from things that were “done to me” but rather how I interpreted and experienced the events of my life. My siblings had gone through many of the same things I had — some of them had gone through much worse — and yet they presented as (and were/are) perfectly normal. Ironically, my siblings are — in the estimation of people who know both me and them — a lot less “together” than I am. But they are/were a whole lot more functional in the most basic ways — particularly socially. They knew how to identify and communicate to others what was going on with them and what they needed in tight spots.

I, on the other hand, had my act together in many ways that they never have, and was a super achiever with a good head on my shoulders in many respects, but in others, I was just a train wreck. I had always had a hell of a time figuring out where I stood in relation to the world around me, what I was feeling, what I was thinking, and what I needed from others. And while the experiences I’d had as a kid were not unlike what others went through, I took everything incredibly hard and couldn’t deal with much of anything. Change was all but impossible for me to stomach. I took any alteration — expected or unexpected — very, very hard. Some changes I took so hard, I apparently blocked them out from my memory, and I only know about them from my parents. Social interactions were pretty much a lost cause with me. Indeed,tending to the most basic things in life were next to impossible… like following conversations, being able to follow through with the easiest of tasks, playing simple schoolyard games like kickball and four-square, interacting with others, and keeping my act together without melting down or going off on wild hyperactive sprees. I was alternately aggressive and emotionally hypersensitive, and I spent a whole lot of my childhood and youth being extremely angry and bitter, and acting out in various ways.

Now, plenty of mental health professionals could probably come up with some workable explanations for all of this, and they’d probably be right. I’m sure plenty of people would have difficulty with what I experienced. My siblings still struggle with the aftermath of similar experiences. But not to the degree that I did/do. In fact, it was the degree of my difficulties that tipped me off that there was something more going on with me. When I took an honest, truthful look at my life experiences, and I compared the outcomes with other comparable individuals, I could very plainly detect a significant difference in degree that — I’m sorry — can’t be explained as trauma or post traumatic stress or even the changing times I grew up in. There was something more going on, which complicated things then. And it was continuing to complicate things for me in the present.

Unfortunately, although many head injured persons fit the above description and thus get sent into traditional analytic or psychodynamic therapy — they often get worse, not better, to everyone’s dismay.

OMG – I wish to hell I’d read this a year ago. It explains so much. Lemme tell you, it’s no friggin’ fun sitting there, week after week, sometimes twice a week, trying “like crazy” to figure out what’s amiss, and why… to be following the standard protocol of plumbing the depths, trying to come up with examples of past distress, trying to identify what’s going on with you… doing what you think (and are told) is the right thing to do, therapeutically… only to be an emotional wreck for days afterwards. And be getting worse, not better.

That’s what happened to me. I wasn’t becoming more centered and together.  I wasn’t better able to cope with the stresses of my life. I was actually having a harder and harder time of it. And I was starting to doubt myself at every turn. I was starting to doubt my judgment, my ability to cope, my sanity. I would sit there for that 50 minutes or so, trying to come up with some examples of what I was feeling or what I had experienced, only to come up empty-handed — and feeling pretty stupid in the process.  I would try to figure out what I was feeling, how I was impacted by such-and-such an experience, what others and said or done that upset me… and try to feel my feelings in general.

Therapy was supposed to help me make sense of things, and in some ways, it did help to have someone to talk to. But it helped me most when I was just talking about my life and not processing it all in a psychotherapeutic context. When I tried to “therapize” my experience, I just ended up feeling stupid and incompetent and beset by all sorts of self-doubt. I often couldn’t follow what my therapist was saying to me, and I could react quickly enough to get them to slow down. I would rush through my sessions with them, just saying out loud what I thought should be said, rather than letting on that I wasn’t following and I wasn’t  articulating what I wanted to articulate. I was so embarrassed that I couldn’t put into words what was going on with me — and in fact, I couldn’t figure out what was going on with me — that I spent an awful lot of time spewing stuff that wasn’t necessarily accurate or reflective of where I was coming from. I had always had such a hard time interacting with people — especially in spoken conversation — I just couldn’t deal with the talk-therapy scene in a really authentic way.

I knew this on some level, though I couldn’t yet put my finger on it, and it made feel like a total fraud and a loser — both because I couldn’t seem to do better in our interactions, and because I didn’t know how to ‘fess up … and do something about it.

As a result, a lot of the problems I was having became even worse, and I started to blow up and melt down and make really stupid choices over and over and over again. I went through three or four jobs in the time I was in traditional talk-therapy, and I was stressing to the point of having spells/episodes that looked a whole lot like seizures of some sort.

Not good.

This happens because the disorder in their lives reflects not primarily underlying psychological conflicts, but the damage to their brains that has resulted in cognitive and executive dysfunctions.

Amen to that. I couldn’t for the life of me figure out why I was screwing up, left and right. I was getting in touch with my feelings, I was feeling them. I was talking about my difficulties. I was releasing old hurts. I was doing what was supposed to be done — or so I thought — but my life was still on a collision course with… well, me. I was making all sorts of bad decisions, and my therapist gave me room to “explore” them as I wished. The only thing was, the decisions put me on a really bad path to some serious professional peril — and I wish they’d spoken up and corrected some of the shitty thought processes that were in play. I wish they’d challenged my thinking on a bunch of subjects. I might not have made the choices I did, and done the stupid-ass things I thought were such good ideas at the time, if they’d just questioned me more closely … with the understanding that my brain tends to misfire at critical times. I was cognitively and executively dysfunctional in some pretty significant ways, but they approached my difficulties from an emotional point of view, rather than a logistical one. They seemed to think that if I just had a better sense of self, and if I overcame my low self-esteem, I would be able to get my life back on track.

Uh…. NOT. Self-esteem has nothing to do with any of it. Nor lacking sense of self. It’s basic system issues that plague me. If anything, my sense of self is my strongest suit, and my self-esteem is for the most part quite intact. But all of my self-regard is useless, if my brain is misfiring and giving me wrong bits of information about what I should do with all that self-esteem and identity stuff.

This has gotten me in trouble more times than I care to think about. I swear… I’ll be feeling really strong and good about how I can do anything I put my mind to… but I won’t realize that fatigue is getting the best of me, and I’m missing cues and clues about what’s going on in the world around me. And I’ll screw up the job I’ve started — like a spreadsheet of numbers I’ve collected, or a piece of programming code I’ve written. I won’t muck up because I don’t feel good about myself, but because I didn’t take the time to walk through the steps of the job I’m doing… and I’ll screw it all up, miscalculating and end up with the wrong answer entirely. Broken program. Wrong numbers. Messed-up results — not because I lack self-esteem, but because my form was crappy.

Low self-esteem wasn’t the source of so many of my problems. MTBI was. Low self-esteem was an effect of the underlying problems — not a cause.

My old therapist also seemed to think that if I looked too closely at the ways in which I was deficient, it would take a toll on my self-esteem. If I explored the details of my screw-ups, I’d get down on myself and lose ground, psychologically. Untrue, untrue, untrue. It was in NOT looking at how I was screwing up, that I got into trouble, because I could never correct my mistakes so I’d do better the next time.  They spent a whole lot of time trying to reassure me that “I could do it”, without empowering me to actually do it in the way I needed to. Actually, I couldn’t do it — at least, not without help. There’s no shame in that, but the way they went about things, they actually made me feel as though there was.

Their lives are disordered because their brains are disordered.

Uh, yah. And acting like I was cognitively and excutively intact, was a huge mistake. For them, and for me. I guess I just didn’t grasp the extent of my difficulties, nor did they. They seemed to think that my lack of initiative stemmed from emotionally based depression, rather than a physical slowing of the brain processes… that my difficulties socially came from low self-esteem, rather than a long history of mucked-up relationships that stemmed from behavioral issues that began around the time of my first TBI and got worse with every successive one. My life, while full and whole and complete and highly functional in some ways, was in a total shambles in others.  It seems to me that that should have raised a flag of some sort — why does someone who is such a top performer and peak achiever in significant ways, also show such profound deficits in others? It’s not emotional in nature and origin. It’s neurological.

“Talking things out” does not solve the problem and may worsen it.

Which it did for me. Talking just made everything worse — it was all talk, no action, and if I talked about my difficulties, their main approach was to reassure me that I was an okay person (which I already knew!) rather than encourage me to deal with the logistics.

This is because traditional therapy removes structure and encourages the spontaneous expression of whatever thoughts and feelings seem most important.

Yet another contributing factor. OMG — can I tell you how many sessions I just rambled on and on without any particular direction? It may have seemed like giving my emotions free rein was a good idea, but they clearly didn’t know how capricious my brain can be around thoughts and feelings. Without structure and purpose, all that cognitive energy just went flying all over the place, leaving me even more confused than before, in many ways. Which did not support my mental health.

Such a process is guaranteed to lead to further disorganization and confusion in a person whose major problem is structuring and organizing the thinking processes, while trying to keep surges of emotion from washing everything away entirely.

Amen to that. Now I can see why my present therapist, who is a neuropsych by training, is constantly steering me away from the emotional exploration I became accustomed to. This new therapist (NT) takes a totally different approach from my Old Therapist (OT), and I have to admit it confused me at first and made me angry and disoriented. I was accustomed to therapy being about venting and “releasing”, but NT was focusing on logistics. And steering me away from overly emotional responses to every little thing (which had been encouraged by OT before).

When individual “therapy” is a successful adjunct to a rehabilitation program, it is a structuring, supportive, problem-solving approach.

And so it is — this new approach with NT is so much more helpful to me. And to everyone around me. My family members have commented that I’m doing a whole lot better, now that I’m seeing NT, and I can tell a huge difference. NT is very supportive, but they don’t let me get away with crappy cognitive processes, and they make me stop and think things through before I take action I’m talking about. They’ve already “talked me back from the edge” of doing something really stupid, a number of times. And this in only a few months. Plus, they’ve talked me through some wrong assumptions and bad information I was working off of, for nearly 20 years. They are talking me through thought processes that have been deeply flawed — yet rote — for decades, now. And I’m revising my perceptions in the process.

That’s just huge. And it’s something that I, as an MTBI survivor, need desperately. I need to be stopped and questioned and challenged. Even if it makes me uncomfortable and mad. I need to be forced to think things through in a careful and deliberate way, not just fly into situations thinking I can do everything on reflex. I can’t. I’m not sure I ever could. But this is the first I’m realizing it fully.

But at least I’m realizing it now. So I can actually do something about it. And make some real progress!

This does not mean that head injured persons cannot have mild or severe psychological problems that either result directly from, or exist (usually existed) separately from the results of their injury.

In my case, I would say that a fair number of my psych issues have stemmed from my long history of screwing up due to MTBI problems. There’s only so many false starts and cock-ups you can commit, until you start to be convinced you’re an idiot and don’t deserve a full and fulfilling life. There’s only so many relationships you can blow away, before you start to think you’re unfit for society. And having people make fun of you and bully you and ostrasize you and tell you you’re lazy and stupid and slow and whatnot also takes a toll.

I’m not complaining and I’m not crying boo-hoo.

I’m just saying…

They can, and often do. It does mean, however, that the traditional psychodynamic approach seldom offers the head-injured person relief from their disordered life.

Yes to this. To get relief from my disordered life, I need specific coping strategies and tools in my “toolbox”. After I’ve stopped making a mess of everything I touch, I can start to rebuild my self-esteem. But not before then.

The psychotherapist who specializes in brain injury must have an appreciation of the impact of brain damage on the patient’s capacity to benefit from the process of therapy.

Which my OT didn’t, I don’t think. At least, I don’t think they understood just how deeply I’d been impacted by a lifetime of injuries and the resulting effects.

Rehabilitation professionals should seek out such specialists if their clients require psychotherapy.

And clients should do the same.

I’m really hoping that this post has offered some food for thought to therapists and clients alike. It’s just so important, and there are so many critical considerations to go into this.

If TBI isn’t considered fully in therapy, the process itself can wreak havoc in an already disordered life… making things worse in the process. Folks may disagree with what I’ve said above, but that’s just my own experience and perception.

Therapy should be helpful. I think we can all agree on that.


All new me… all the time…

I have been contemplating my situation as an MTBI survivor pretty intensely, lately. Thinking about how it’s changed my brain — not only since 2004, when I fell down a flight of stairs and smacked the back of my head hard a number of times on the steps… but throughout my entire life. After all, I have had a wide array of injuries — I got knocked out, I’ve had several sports concussions, I’ve been in car accidents, and I’ve had other falls.

Head injury has undoubtedly affected my life, and until a few years ago, I had no idea that the problems I’d always had (but never wanted to own up to) were in fact of a common kind and traceable to common reasons — mild traumatic brain injuries.

The more I realize just how much MTBI has affected me, the more I realize that I really need to re-learn how to walk through the world. Not just because of my most recent accident, but because of a lifetime of TBI-related changes to my cognitive-behavioral version of reality. I need to seriously back it up and rethinking just about everything I assume to be true… because so much of it has been shaped by TBI and clouded by a broken brain… and now I have tools — the Give Back Orlando material as well as other info and tools I’ve come across — to repair some of the damage and renew my life.

Some of the repairs are relatively small – like just changing around some of the things I do when I get up in the a.m. Others are larger, like changing direction with my work and being more realistic about my abilities and inclinations. But the bottom line is, I really need to rethink many of the aspects of my life and not take everything for granted, all the time.

The habits of thought and action I have become accustomed to, may be working against me. I know many of them are. So, I need to fix that.

I’ve recently reached the conclusion that MTBI, as “mild” as it may be, has significantly skewed my perception and interpretation of the world around me and it has effectively caused me to live in a different version of reality than lots of other people. Many situations in my life, I now believe, may have been very different from how I perceived them, which has caused me to grow up with inaccurate understandings of others and my place in the world.

Let me explain — I have always had a heck of a time interpreting people’s social cues. I don’t always understand how to make conversation (correction — I very rarely understand how to make conversation) and I don’t always understand what people are saying to me. This has happened for as long as I can remember. It’s also a point of frustration for people, that I don’t communicate as well as they apparently expect me to (while talking, not when writing – one of the reasons I write so enthusiastically is that conversation and spoken communication is such a bear of an undertaking for me).

When I was growing up I was constantly getting things turned around, and people would lose patience with me. They would raise their voices at me — to get my attention or out of mounting frustration. And I would often startle, because I had trouble following what was going on. I’d then get that rush of adrenaline and heart-pounding and all of that uproar in my head and body that told me “You’re in trouble — they’re mad at you, and they’re yelling at you because you’re a bad person.” I thought I was in trouble — that people hated me. That they didn’t like me. That I was being bad and awful and problematic.

But actually, in some cases, they were just trying to get my attention, and they did it in ways that were less gentle than they could be.

This happened over and over and over again. And over the years, when I was a kid, I developed this godawful complex about  being a terrible person, an ogre, a monster… you name it. I was convinced that everyone hated me — teachers, parents, other kids. A lot of them were unkind to me, especially my peers, but my assumptions about being bad and always being in trouble may not have actually been true.

So, I ended up with a variety of complexes and a nagging suspicion that I was good for nothing and just a drain and a chore for everyone to deal with… when actually, I just had a hard time keeping up, nobody realized it, and they did a clumsy job of bringing me up to speed.

In many ways, I think that my MTBIs had a negative impact on my mental health. Depression and PTSD and low self-esteem have all hounded me my entire life, along with a bunch of other conditions that could be in the DSM-IV, but I’m not looking up for the sake of time. I also don’t want to know. Heck, I’m reasonably functional in basic ways… why belabor it with mental health diagnoses? 😉

One of the other byproducts of this cognitive skewing is that some of my greatest skills and talents have been systematically overlooked and underdeveloped by not only the world, but also myself.

That anosognosia business (not knowing what you don’t know) has complicated my life by diverting so very much of my energy into trying to smooth over and patch up my foibles in the areas where I don’t excel (but didn’t realize it), meanwhile diverting so very much of my energy away from the areas where I have the greatest strengths. 

What a waste. All my life, I’ve been trying to make up for what I lacked, which in many cases just isn’t coming back, and in the meanwhile I’ve neglected the areas where I am strongest… thinking I need to be at least 75% all across the board, instead of allowing myself to be at 30% in some areas, while being at 99% in others.

That deliberate focus on making up for deficits at the expense of raw talent is how people dealt with special needs kids when I was growing up — trying like crazy to get them moderately functional where they were weakest and most struggling… all the while neglecting the areas where they/we were highly, highly, almost eerily functional.

Missed opportunities for the sake of common denominators.  For the sake of my sanity, I just can’t contemplate what that’s cost me…

So, now I’m going to do something about it. Because I can. Because I’m entitled. I have a right to do everything in my power to make the most of the abilities I have, while letting the less-strong areas just be. I have a right to tend to myself and gather all the knowledge I can. Even if  I’m not highly educated in a traditional sense, with all the degrees and the certifications and whatnot, I can be highly educated in a personal, modern sense. There is so much great information out there, and I have a knack for reading and digesting things over time — all the while making use of them.*

*Indeed, one of the things I love about the Give Back Orlando material is that it’s geared for self-therapy, and it never tells you “You’re just a peon without a Ph.D — what do you know!”  Dr. Schutz actually tells us what books we can read, and where we can turn for answers, which is truly amazing in the highly (almost rabidly) territorial intellectual property driven world we currently inhabit.

I’ve got my notebooks, I’ve got my library card, I’ve got my file folders and my lists of issues I need to address. I’m paying attention to myself at a much deeper level than ever before, and I’m determined to work at it as best I can, so I can overcome what’s standing in my way. I’m not just going to roll over, saying, “Oh, well, I got hit on the head a lot over the course of my life, so I guess that disqualifies me from living!”

It’s not about that, with me. Hell no! It’s about taking an objective look at what in my thought processes and behavioral patterns needs fixing – and then fixing it as best I can.

Or compensating for it.

Or avoiding situations that play to the parts of me that can’t be fixed.

I have sustained multiple mild traumatic brain injuries over the course of my life. These injuries have altered my perceptions of life around me and fostered erroneous deductions that have led to poor choices and bad behavior. They have also stoked mental health issues that have their root not in what was done to me or what happened to me, but how I thought about what took place in my life. I am a grown-up individual in my mid-40s who cannot afford to harbor erroneous thinking and poorly constructed patterns any longer.

So, I’m going to do something about it. I’m changing my life, one day at a time. One minute at a time. One experience at a time.

But change it, I will.