To my 24 new followers – welcome

Welcome, all! I'm glad you're here.
Welcome, all! I’m glad you’re here.

I have been looking at my WordPress stats, following up on who has recently followed this blog.

In the last 2 weeks, 24 of you have joined me on this journey (22 via WordPress, 2 via email), so welcome. I don’t mean to be rude or take you for granted — please know that I appreciate you following, and I hope I bring something positive to your life.

I’m about to go out for my morning walk on an amazingly beautiful day, and before I do, I just want to say:

Whatever brought you to this blog, was probably for a very good reason. People come here all the time, not knowing what they will find, then they discover something that helps them. It’s both by accident, and by design. I don’t have any particular “content strategy” in mind, other than writing about the things that matter to me, as a TBI survivor dealing with an invisible set of difficulties, a regular person trying to build the best life possible, and as a member of the larger community who is sure that I’m not the only one who feels this way.

There are times when I am annoying, I whine and bitch and complain and am not my best self by any stretch of the imagination. I can be petulant and cranky and self-absorbed, and I can be a real trial at times — especially to myself 😉

Be that as it may, I have an incredible amount of goodness in my life, and I want to share that experience, as well as show others how I’ve gotten there through a combination of hard work and perseverance, and using my noggin to determine if what I’m doing is actually working. The times when I fail are the biggest lessons — and at times the most valuable.

I’m not afraid to fail. I just get a little tired of getting back up all the time.

But then, don’t we all…?

I know I am not alone in my frustrations and challenges. I’m human, and whether you’re dealing with a brain injury, another sort of injury, past trauma, ongoing difficulties in your life, or a hidden condition that others can never suspect is going on, we are all in this together, and we all have so much to share, if we take the time and put forth the effort.

The effort is not easy. But it is worth it. I start most of my days on this blog, because I remember all too well what it’s like to go through life in pain and frustration and despair, and feel so terribly alone. Some days I’d rather be doing something else than typing into a machine, and I can go for days without writing a word. But I know this is important — to me as well as others who find their way here and really value hearing someone else talk about life in ways that they can relate to.

That happens all too seldom. But I hope it won’t happen here.

Joining us today from...
Joining us today from…

So, to all of you — followers, as well as new readers from all over the world — thank you for your support. I’m happy you’re here.

 

 

 

What I’ve left behind

Somewhere, someone cares about your loss

I’ve been thinking a lot, lately, about the things I’ve left behind over the years. The people, the places, the things… as well as the abilities and interests that have gone away, due in large part to TBI. With Thanks-giving fast approaching, here in the U.S., and travels to old haunts and family activities on the horizon, I have been thinking a lot about how things are different now than they were before — as well as how things might have been different, had I not fallen in 2004 and gotten screwed up with that head injury.

I’ve also been thinking a lot about how I handle my life now, compared with before, due to my TBI recovery work, and my discussions with my neuropsych. The professional I see for rehab work is not very big on acknowledging or dealing with the losses I’ve experienced — in part because my perception of those things has been pretty heavily skewed, and it isn’t always accurate. And my NP is there to get me to move forward, not stay stuck in the past.

In any case, they don’t seem to believe me when I tell them about how things were before my injury. Like so many people, they make up their minds about who and how I am, and they use that as a reference point for dealing with me. Their reference point isn’t always accurate — but then, my own reference points are not always accurate, either. So, between all these different reference points, without having any confidence in specific details about Who I Really Am and How I Used To Be, I just keep moving forward, keep living my life, and I don’t try not to worry about.

But aside from the general haziness of who I really am and how I really am, I have been dealing with a lot of sense of loss, lately. I have immediate family members who have either passed on, or are in their late-late golden years and may not be around much longer. I also have family members who make what I consider really un-healthy decisions and are locked in a constant struggle with drama they have invented with their own personal choices. All in all, it’s pretty depressing to go visit my family, because there is so much unhappiness — due in large part to people making decisions that are not healthy or helpful for them and those around them. The worst part is, they can’t seem to see any way out of their decisions, as though they “have” to do those things that hurt them.

Am I being vague? Here are some examples of choices by loved-ones that depress me:

  • Moving in with someone and then marrying them, despite the fact that they have a drinking problem… then being stuck in a marriage that looks great on the outside to everyone who cannot see that your spouse is structuring their entire life schedule around getting drunk — and you’re stuck in that schedule, too. For years. Till you leave them and start living with someone else who doesn’t seem like a much better choice.
  • Losing your spouse to cancer at a relatively young age, when you have two young kids, and never getting those kids proper counseling help for their loss… and marrying someone who looks exactly like the spouse you lost and you don’t really love, but is a good parent for your kids… and burying yourself in a very extreme religion to dull the pain of your choices.
  • Having a lot of health issues that are directly related to lifestyle — eating foods that are bad for you, keeping a schedule that is unhealthy, and ignoring the warning signs your body is giving you — and being progressively more crippled each year from the foods you eat and the way you live your life.
  • Spending your life in a profession that is combative and antagonistic, and bringing that combativeness and antagonism into the home where you verbally attack anyone who disagrees with you, hurting and pushing people away “on principle”.
  • Choosing to marry for practical, popular reasons instead of love, then spending the rest of your adult life pining for a deep emotional connection with your spouse that has never been there, and never will be… refusing to accept responsibility for your choice in partners… and being on heavy-duty meds to dull the pain of your choices and your refusal to make different choices in your life that would suit you better but be less popular with others… Basically medicating yourself to avoid taking any responsibility for your life.

I don’t mean to be cold or unkind — my frustration comes from knowing just how much better life can be, and feeling great pain for the individuals I love and care for, who seem so stuck in the ruts they’ve grooved into their lives. We don’t have to be victims! I want to pick them up and shake them and let them know there is a better way. But it’s like we’re living in parallel universes and speaking in a different language, and they cannot hear or understand what I’m saying.

Now, I know life is never going to be perfect, for sure, and there is much pain and struggle for all of us. Most people struggle with inner demons that no one else can see, but we fight with daily. But the fight doesn’t have to be miserable. We can see it as a regular part of life that can bring us some freedom and relief — and help to define and refine our characters.

So, there is hope. At the same time, there is so much grief and loss and pain. This time of year is very hard for me, because I lost some important people around this time of year, and the autumn-time experience of loss still stays with me to this day. It’s like it’s in my cells — and I re-live it each year, even decades after those losses.

So, the theme for my life during this time of year is mourning. If I don’t do something constructive, the grief just takes over. I know I have many, many reasons to be thankful — and maybe that’s the thing that will save me — Thanks-giving — yet I cannot seem to shake this grief, this sense of having lost so much over the years of my life, thanks to TBI and the results of it, starting in childhood and on into my adult life. I cannot help but wonder, what might have been possible, had I never gotten hurt like that… had I gotten help… had people known about TBI when I was a kid, and given me half a chance. I cannot help but wonder, what might have happened, had I told someone about my head injury when it actually happened in 2004, instead of lying about it and then watching as my whole life went to hell for no apparent reason.

But no, it didn’t happen that way. And I am bereft.

This is something that I think many people fail to see and address — the losses of TBI, the importance of recognizing and mourning of those losses, and dealing with the deep grief that comes from knowing that once upon a time you could do better… that once upon a time, you took certain things for granted… that once upon a time, so much was possible… but now it’s all different. It’s not like that anymore. Maybe somewhat, somehow, but not exactly. And you have to start from scratch in many ways, and fight your way back to where you want to be — if you can ever get there at all.

Sometimes, you can’t get there as quickly as you’d like, or not at all, and then you have to let it go. You have to just cut your losses and move on.

But “cutting losses” doesn’t factor in the pain that comes from those losses, and that’s what I want to talk about today.

When I try to explain to people what it was like for me before I fell in 2004, I get blank stares.

When I try to tell them how I used to be able to just pick things up — new programming techniques, new ideas, new information, they just look at me like it’s no big deal. When I tell them how I used to be in the thick of craziness on the job, day in and day out, without any real negative side-effects, they almost don’t believe me, and they cringe if I tell them what it’s like for me now (if I even do – because nowadays, I don’t).

When I try to tell them how fluid my approach used to be, before I fell — I would see a challenge and I would rise to it without giving it a second thought — they almost don’t believe me, either.

And when I tell them how much money I used to make and how much money I was worth, the flat-out disbelieve me. Because that would be impossible for someone my age without a college degree, doing the kind of work I used to do.

This is partly because they didn’t really know me before. They didn’t know the line of work I was in, and they didn’t know what it was like to work for my employer. They don’t come from the world where I work, each day, and they have no idea just how good things were for me, and how well I could function in those circumstances, and how rewarding it all was. For people who know me now but didn’t know me before, my accounts of how things used to be just sounds like confabulation — or me making things up. Because the difference between now and then is so dramatic and so extreme, that they probably could not begin to imagine me as I once was.

As I believe I once was.

See, there’s the rub — maybe I was that way, or maybe it was my perception of how I was. Maybe I was “all that”, and maybe I wasn’t. I may never know. My memory plays tricks on me all the time, and the best that I can do, some days, is muster a “feeling” about the past that seems true.

I know things used to be different for me. I know I used to be different. Looking at my bank account, and considering the kind of work I do today, compared with 10 years ago, there is a radical difference. Like night and day. And the fact that I am struggling terribly with money these days, just maddens me. It was never like this before. Never. Ever. But now it’s a daily challenge to keep my finances in order and keep myself on track. I manage, but it’s not nearly as easy as it once was.

Money doesn’t lie. That’s the bottom line. And what my money says, is that I’m a very different person than I was before.

Hence the sense of loss. A profound and sometimes debilitating sense of loss. And I am pretty much alone in this sense, because either nobody understands what it’s like to have so much, and lose it. Or they don’t believe I ever had what I once had, in the first place. Or (even worse) they think that nobody deserves to have what I had before, so it was a kind of karmic justice that now I have such troubles.

Loss. Lonely, lonely loss.

But I cannot stay tied down in my depression. I am working my way out of a hole, and I have to handle this alone, so I have developed ways to deal with this whole grief thing.

The first thing I do, is to acknowledge it. Not minimize it. Recognize the experience of loss and grief and mourning as very, very real. And very, very important.

The next thing I do, is understand what it is that I am mourning the loss of.

I recently realized that I can group my losses into two different categories:

  • Invented Loss – the “loss” of things that I once-upon-a-time decided that I wanted and needed, but I never really did want or need. These are losses like:
    • false friends (who I once thought were my real friends) who ditched me when I stopped having so much money
    • possessions that other people told me mattered, but I just didn’t care about
    • 100% devotion and dedication to employers who were more than happy to pull the rug out from under me when I ran into trouble, and
    • public approval and a sterling reputation, regardless of how sleazy the people were whom I wanted to respect me, regardless of what I needed to do to uphold that reputation
  • Genuine Loss – the true loss of things that I really did want and need, but couldn’t hang onto, like:
    • being able to read things and understand them immediately
    • constant abundant energy
    • clear, quick thinking and definite decisions
    • my ability to earn top dollar almost without thinking about it
    • my ability to learn new things quickly and use what I learned quickly
    • confidence in my memory – things didn’t used to seem this foggy before (I’m not sure if this is a genuine or invented loss, however, because it could be that my memory was always spotty, I just wasn’t aware of it)

In some cases, it’s hard for me to tell whether my losses are genuine or invented. My memory is a classic case — it really wasn’t until I started working with my neuropsychologist that I realized how spotty my memory was. And in fact, when I think back, there are big parts of my past that I don’t remember — people always assumed that it was because I had been traumatized as a child and I blocked a lot of things out, but more and more I think it was a lot of other things, including a spotty memory during childhood, thanks to repeated head injuries.

Furthermore, human memory is notoriously unreliable, even with people who have no history of TBI. Just ask the cops. People who see the same thing will have different interpretations, and each person will be convinced that they’re right. That’s just how we’re built. It’s just how we are. TBI or no, memory is a tricky thing, so it doesn’t make that much sense for me to be upset over the crappiness of my memory. Who’s to say that anyone’s is any good?

But still — I think the thing that gets me the most is the loss of my old confidence about who I was and what I was all about. So much changed, so much has altered with me in the past years — 8 years, since my fall down the stairs a day or two after Thanksgiving in 2004 — that some days I don’t know who the hell I am, where I’m going, or what even matters to me.

Some days, I wake up a complete blank — I have no point of reference, I don’t know what day it is, what I should be doing, what I want to do… anything. It’s like everything has been wiped clean. Then I’ll sit for a little bit, re-orient myself, look at my lists, and it will come back to me. Some days, it feels like I’m starting from scratch. Completely. With no experiences from before to guide me.

And I miss that old feeling of knowing who I am and what I’m about and what matters most to me. The things that used to drive me — reading and writing and studying and grasping the secrets of my universe… the subjects that used to absolutely drive me are just not there anymore. What’s left? Other things. New interests. Different subjects that draw me in… if I can remember them.

Ultimately, that’s probably the biggest loss I deal with — losing my sense of self, who I am vs. who I think I was — and losing my confidence about who that “self” once was, and now is. The second-guessing, the not-knowing… it’s a lot to learn to handle, and it’s a lot to learn to manage. I will manage, somehow — I AM managing somehow — and do that keeps my mind off my troubles. But some days, it just gets to me.

Like today. Like right now. I have this deep and abiding sense that I have lost something very important to me, but I’m not exactly sure what that is. I’m not sure if it’s one big thing, or if it’s a lot of little things, and as much as I am determined to build back my life, I just don’t know if/how/when I will be able to do that to my satisfaction.

Because building “back” is a point of confusion, to begin with. My memory of how things once were is not great, so where’s my point of reference? My memory of how I once was, is also not great, so how do I know if I’ve even gotten “back”? I think the thing for me is having the old feeling again — having a sense of who I am and where I am and how my life is… getting that old sense back. If it’s even possible.

Of all the issues that come with TBI, the grief business is probably the most difficult to handle, because it is so hidden, it is so personal, and it’s hard to find others who understand the extent of your loss. Everyone wants you to move on. Everyone wants you to focus on the positives. Everyone wants you to get back to normal and quit feeling sorry for yourself. But TBI can take from us the very things that make us who “we” are — and when you lose that… even if it’s just for a while… it can be vastly unsettling, and it can linger at the back of your mind, like a jabbering monkey, making it hard to just get on with your life — and do the things that will bring you back to where you want to be.

I’m not saying it’s the end. But grief and mourning for the things we have lost — especially realizing that the loss does matter — is an important part of recovery. And until we really look at it and find a way to deal with it constructively, it can overtake us and run our lives without our even knowing.

That’s what I think about it, anyway. And now, it’s time for me to stave off this depression and get my circulation moving. Time for a walk — perhaps in the woods.

Onward. To the future.

Invisible Me – The interactive dynamics of a doubly-hidden disability.

Hidden disability is an “interesting” phenomenon. On the one hand, a person can have real and serious issues with interacting with the world around them, be it due to a neurological issue or a physical one. But on the other, the rest of the world cannot see what’s going on, and because people tend to be very visual — especially when they first meet someone — and they work off visual clues to figure out how to interact with someone, if they cannot see your difficulties, they may have a hard time:

  1. believing you have something going on with you
  2. figuring out how to interact with you effectively

I have heard of an individual who was legally deaf — couldn’t hear a thing — but had become so adept at reading lips, nobody believed they were deaf when they first met them. And stories abound about people who are autistic or have some learning differences, who are not recognized as having difficulties by the mainstream, and so cannot get the help they need.

Having a brain injury can be about the most extreme form of hidden disability I can think of — and that’s not just because I’ve had ’em. Think about it — the brain is something we ALL take for granted. It’s perhaps(?) THE most important organ in the body, when it comes to regular functioning. Yes, you need properly functioning lungs and heart and other internal organs to stay alive. But the brain is what pulls it all together and keeps us off life-support and a (semi)vegetative state.

Our brain is what makes us human, in my own estimation.

And yet, we know so little about it. I’m dumbfounded by the degree of ignorance that prevails about how our brain works and what it does. We all have one, we all rely on it, we all use it constantly. Yet, how many of us truly understand our own brain? And how many of us are prepared and equipped to explore its inner workings? It just amazes me, that we don’t know more about it, in this age of digital imaging and info gathering. We can collect moon dust and photograph stars and new planets in distant galaxies, but we don’t know how our friggin’ brain works? What’s up with that?!

Anyway, I’ll redirect my outrage, now…  Hmmm… what would be a more productive use of my energy? I know — I’ll get back on topic! 😉

Anyway, when the brain starts to malfunction — especially after a relatively long time of behaving normally — things can get very difficult, both inside and outside. The rest of the world can’t necessarily see that you’ve got hurdles to cross in your daily life — cognitive issues, physiological issues, emotional issues… And when you slip up, people can be pretty hard on you. If they can see that you’ve got a limp or you’ve lost an arm, they can adjust their interaction with you (tho’ lots of people don’t do a very good job of adjusting in a positive way, and some mean-spirited people just use that as an invitation to be cruel or ignorant). But if they can’t see you’ve got issues, then your interactions with them can become… well, problematic.

Now, let’s add to that mix some of the interior problems that come with having an impaired brain.

Take, for example, the condition called “anosognosia“. This really fascinating condition is literally not knowing that there is something wrong with you. The injured brain doesn’t register that there are difficulties in its experience. It won’t realize that, for example, the left side of the body is not moving, that you’re not taking care of one side of yourself, that you cannot do certain things, that your judgment is impaired… all sorts of things can slip through the cracks of an injured brain that’s “anosognosic” (I think that’s how you’d describe it). It’s a pretty common, but not very well-understood condition that some people are studying and have written about. One of the folks I’m a real fan of is George Prigatano, M.D., who (I believe) works out of the Barrow Neurological Institute in Arizona. He’s written a fair amount about anosognosia, and I really like his style. He also seems like a decent fellow — from his photo and his writing style. (Then again, as with most things, I could be wrong — my brain could be playing tricks on me)

So, when your own disability is hidden even from you, it can make things really interesting… frustrating… confounding… infuriating… confusing… amusing… hazardous… adventurous… you name it. With brain injuries, everybody in the mix can be at a loss about what’s going on with you, and how best to handle things.

I’m thinking in particular about many conversations I’ve had with people over the course of my life that went very badly due to my penchant for confabulation. Confabulation is when you get the details of a story wrong, when you think you’re getting it right. You think you’re being 100% accurate, but you’re actually missing important details, getting them turned around, or whatever. I would be talking to someone and I would get the facts and figures turned around — like times I was at a place… or things I did… or people I saw… or the progression of events. I would get so turned around, without even knowing it, and by the end of the conversation, I sounded like I was either a pathological liar, a fabulist, or I was trying to impress them with bogus information.

All I wanted to do, was relate an interesting story or tidbit, and I ended up looking like an idiot.

Now, until about a year ago, I had no clue that the head traumas I’ve experienced over the course of my life had affected me the way they had. I didn’t realize A) that I had issues, and B) why that could be. I figured I just wasn’t trying hard enough to think things through, and I really beat myself up over this stuff a lot. No one else realized that I sustained multiple tbi’s, either — it wasn’t something I talked about, and it wasn’t something I thought was worth mentioning. And no one around me seemed to realize that my confabulation issues were possibly neurological, and not character-flaw-based.

So everyone in the mix — myself and others — went around with the belief that I had trouble telling the truth at times. And that’s a hard thing to bear. Especially when you don’t mean to mis-speak.

Yes, the doubly-hidden disability of brain injury can complicate things in so many logistical ways, when it comes to interacting with a world that cannot see the problems you’re having… and you yourself cannot tell what the problem is (if you can even tell there is a problem).

In my case, my problems are often not obvious to everyone around me. I they “seem fine” but I’m not processing information as fast as everyone around me. I tend to think visually, using pictures and “little movies” of past experiences to understand what’s going on around me. And that visual processing — while it’s more in-depth and full-spectrum than purely verbal thinking for me — takes longer than just thinking in worlds. Or I might be having trouble with sensory processing — when I’m not able to tolerate the lights/sounds/smells or other stimuli that everyone else is fine with, and I can experience a lot of distress that others cannot relate to because they just don’t have that experience. If you have light sensitivity or you’ve got high tactile defensiveness, you know what I’m talking about. If you seize when you hear certain sounds or smell certain things, you now what I’m talking about. But most of the neurotypical world, which isn’t subject to such disruptive experiences, may not be able to fully grasp what it’s like, which makes it hard to figure out how to relate to someone like me.

But how does it look?

I’ve been thinking hard about how to express the dynamics that take place between a person with hidden disabilities interacts with the ‘normal’ world. A picture’s worth lots and lots of words, so I’ll try to illustrate. Using my own experience as a guideline, here’s how I conceptualize my own situation:
invisible me - I'm on my own

I’ve got all these different internal parts of me that are unique to me and that take up space in me. They aren’t ALL there is to me, but they are significant parts. Things like mood volatility (lability). Things like slowed mental processing speed. Things like non-verbal social communication preference and difficulty decoding auditory input. Things like not being able to take a lot of noise and light. Things like needing to rest more than most people I know. They’re not bad things, per se. They just are. But they do make up a substantial part of me.

Now…

Enter the world…

invisible me - the rest of the world shows up

People around me have a different “color” to them, a different “shape” to their lives. They seem different to me, and while I recognize them and relate to them as other forms in the world, they are definitely different than me. Of course, everyone outside of me, being “shaded” they way they are, with their own “hues” of perception, have plenty in common with others, but they don’t always realize that I’m not like them.

And so they tend to encroach on me…

invisible me - the rest of the world encroaches on me

I don’t think they necessarily mean to encroach on me and impose their own specific sensibilities on me, but that’s what they do. I think that’s what most regular people do with everyone they meet. People need to feel included. They need to feel like they’re part of something. They need to feel a connection with others. There’s nothing wrong with that — it’s one of the things that makes us human, and it’s good. But a lot of times, in their intention to include others in their circles, they jump to conclusions about how other people are — how they should be — how they can be. How I should/can be.

They make a lot of assumptions about who I am and what matters to me, and what I want to do with my time and my attention. They tend to impose their views on me, thinking that I’m just like everyone else. What they don’t see, is that the shapes that make up my inner life are not shaded like theirs with the same hues. I am a “different color” than them, but because I don’t have the same hue as they, my own personal “flavor” of personality is invisible. And they don’t realize I’m not like them at all.

But I do.

And sometimes I need to “take my space” and carve out a piece of the world that is mine, all mine.

invisible me - I carve out my space and say what isn't me

I am often so busy trying to decode the sensations and stimuli and hidden clues of the world around me, that things like politics and economics and gossip and star-studded newscasts are either too much for me to take, or they’re so extraneous and irrelevant to my daily functioning, that they’re an annoyance at best and a draining distraction at worst.

I just have to block it all out, to remember who I am, and keep on top of my processing and functional difficulties… to just maintain a daily way of life without becoming completely exhausted and depleted, and then screw up my life all over again.

So, sometimes, I have to just come right out and tell people, “I don’t understand a word you’re saying.”

Or… “I would like to join you for drinks after work, but I’m exhausted. Yes, I know it’s only Thursday, but I’m really beat.”

Or… “I know you’re really excited about seeing that movie on opening night, but I can’t take being in a crowd of people waiting in line for tickets… and then being in a closed dark space with lots of different smells and sounds for hours on end.”

Or… “I have absolutely no interest in what you’re discussing. I really don’t care about American Idol, I really don’t care who gets voted off the island, I really don’t care about someone’s clothes, I really don’t care about their hair. I don’t care who is best-dressed and who is worst-dressed.”

Of course, this doesn’t always sit well with the rest of the world.

Sometimes people react with surprise. Sometimes they react with offense. Sometimes they’re amused and have to admit they secretly agree with me. But whatever their reaction, I can tell that it sets me apart from them.

invisible me - the rest of the world gets pissed off at me

Regular people who aren’t dealing with disability, I’ve found, sometimes really dislike being told that their pet peeves and attachments are not essential to me.

They may feel invalidated, and they don’t like being invalidated.

They don’t like being excluded from the world of others — from my world. They want to interact with me, but I just can’t…

They don’t like feeling dismissed, and sometimes when I brush them off they seem to feel that way. They don’t realize that I just don’t have the bandwidth to be interacting with them the way they need me to.

And some especially insecure folks really dislike having it brought to their attention that they are not necessarily in the right all the time, and some people have other things to think about, than all the stuff we’re fed on a regular basis through the news and media.

So, people tend to get mad at me. They get upset that I’m not validating their fears and insecurities. They get upset that I’m not participating in their conversations. They get tweaked that I’ve got other things to think about than American Idol and Survivor and the Atkins Diet. They can’t see why I don’t compliment their car or their clothes or their job title.

It’s not that I don’t want to — well, sometimes I don’t — it’s that I am trying to keep myself stable in a world that constantly bombards me with all sorts of stimuli that I have a really hard time managing. People look at me and think, “They’re so together… they’re so mellow and calm and intelligent and thoughtful… ” And they interact with me as though I had everything together, because they cannot see the frayed wiring in my brain, they cannot detect the subtle clues that I’m having trouble with my sensory input, they cannot see the intense pain that simple contact with my clothing causes me. They cannot see the pain in my head that never, ever goes away.

They have no way of knowing what difficulties I’m having, and if they did, it would probably freak them out. If people knew half of what my daily experience is like, I suspect they would weep. I’ve done my share of weeping, but it’s not the most productive use of my time. I have a life to live.

And so I capitulate.

For the sake of navigating the seas of social interaction, I pretend to care about the details of their lives. I pretend to care about their hobbies, their travels, their children, their houses, their pets. I pretend to care about the stock market. I pretend to care about the election. I feign interest in their lives. I mirror their statement with carefully re-phrased repetitions of what they say to me.

invisible me - what happens when I cave to the pressure

It’s actually quite easy to do — all you have to do, when someone says something to you, is repeat it back to them in a different words, with a “punch” of positive emotion that validates them and makes them think you’re on the same wavelength as them.

Case in point:

Guy on the street says, “Hey – did you see the game the other night?”

I say, “No, but I heard about it.” (which is true, because he just mentioned it)

Guy on the street says, “The team is doing great this year!”

I say, “You bet! They’re kickin’ ass!”

Guy on the street says, “We’re going all the way! Can you feel it?!”

I say, “Go Pats!!/Go Lions!!/Go Bears!!” or “Go ________ (whatever team) is local!!!” and I give it a real punch, to make him think I’m totally on board.

Guy on the street goes his own way, feeling like he’s just had a personal exchange with another fan, and I go my own way, having had a successful interaction with someone who needed to connect with someone.

I don’t do it to deceive people. I do it to let them feel like they’re participating in my life. In some cases — especially if the interaction feels a little edgy or dangerous — I do it to assuage them, to pacify them, to make them think I agree with them, when to disagree might result in an argument — an argument that I cannot and will not win, and which may get me in trouble.

It’s not 100% socially accurate, but it works. They’re happy, I’m off the hook.

But in a more in-depth relationship, in my closer friendships and intimate connections, following this strategy compromises the parts of me that are true to me. It’s one thing, to have a casual conversation with people on the street whom I’ll never see again. But in my real life, in my deeper life, in my genuine life, this strategy just works against me, and I lose out.

When I “act the part” that other people expect of me, the parts of me that need special attention, the parts of me that are different and unusual and full of nuance, can get blurred and full of noise. And the parts of others that I try to emulate, as I’m pretending they’re part of me, are just blurred and full of noise

Ultimately, in the end, who is truly served by my attempts at simulating normalcy? In the outside world, it may serve to keep me safe and buffered from the dangers that come from being radically different and deeply defenseless. But in my real life, the up-close-and-personal sides of me, all that is achieved is that the folks around me who cannot — will not — recognize my differences, are placated and appeased and made to feel a little less uncomfortable around me, while I am left at an internal disadvantage in the world.

What I’d really like most is this:

invisible me - what I would like most

That is, for people to recognize there are radical differences within me that prevent me from being just like everyone else… and for people to realize that every “normal” person has within them some aspects that are similar to me, that make them different from the norm. My differences do not make me a threat to others. My different information processing speeds and methodologies pose no danger to others — if anything, they actually help. And my sensory issues, while they are at times problematic and can exclude me from living a full life, heighten my abilities to detect certain details that just fly by others. My on-again-off-again coordination issues may disqualify me from professional sports, and they may cause me to knock lots of things off counters and break things I just try to pick up, but there are also lessons to be learned from slowing down and not flying around at a break-neck pace.

Ultimately, in addition to my accommodating the rest of the world by adapting myself (however superficially) to it, I would also like the “permission” and ability to carve out a space for myself in the world that is truly genuine and authentic to who and what I really am — a mild traumatic brain injury survivor whose experience is atypical and whose abilities vary from the norm. I want the right to express myself and my talents and my abilities in a way that is true to me and my essential nature. And I’d like others to find within themselves the parts of them that are not “normal” — and come to accept and integrate them as a regular part of human experience.

We all have differences, we are all varied creatures on this good earth. We all have our secrets and our hidden abilities and disabilities. My deepest hope is that we may someday create a world where all of us are able to participate in ways that make the most of our abilities and shield us from the pressures to compromise our safety and overstep our common-sense boundaries, in order to appease others or fit in with a world that cannot accept our warts along with our beauty marks.

I want a world without narrow-minded judgment… a world that has the good sense to find the best in each of us and bring that out, while forgiving us for our limitations. I want a world that cares more about its own survival, than keeping up appearances. I want something real. And I want something dignified. For all of us.

Call me crazy, but I don’t think it’s too much to ask.