Tracking my progress, step by step

I’ve had some questions from folks about how to use the log pages I created. Here’s how I do it, with some sample info filled in the way I fill it in. I created four different forms, filled out with sample details, like I do. You’re welcome to use these as templates for your own self-therapy/rehab.

Again, the way you do this — if you do it at all — is totally up to you. But this is how I do it:

  1. I start out the day, recording how much sleep I got, and listing the things I want to get done, as well as when I want to do them — as shown in the attached Morning Log Sample. A lot of times, I’ll list out things I plan to do, the night before — e.g., when I intend to get up and go through my morning routine, etc. I tend to write down even the smallest activities, if they are significant. I list things like the steps of my morning routine and standard-issue activities which are the bread-and-butter of my daily ritual, no matter how “basic” get included, if they are important for me.
  2. As my day progresses, I keep track of what I’m doing, and how I’m doing it. Like in the attached Noontime Log Sample. It might seem like a lot of work, but really, when you’re actively managing your time and you must keep to a schedule, it’s not optional. And when you incorporate it into your daily life, it’s really not that much effort.
  3. Later in the day, I’ll fill in more information, like in the attached Afternoon Log Sample. Keep in mind that this day’s info is a Sunday — a light day for me. If it were a weekday, I would have a lot more detail and a lot more stuff listed to do.
  4. At the end of the day, I’ll fill in my daily journal, like in the attached Evening Log Sample. I use a highlighter to mark the things I’ve gotten right, and the things I messed up. It’s important for me to distinguish between the things that turned out differently because I messed up (shown in red) and the things that turned out differently just because priorities changed or I did things a little differently (shown in orange). I also do my “360 feedback” journaling. I don’t write a whole lot, but I do spend some time examining my day and thinking about what went right and what went wrong. I really try to focus on what I did right, since there are days when those experiences are rare, and I need as much positive reinforcement as I can get. But I also really think about the things that went wrong, keeping in mind what I will do differently next time.

Again, it might seem like a lot of work, but when you incorporate this practice into your daily routine, it becomes a way of life.

“An unexamined life is not worth living,” someone once said.

That sounds depressing, so I prefer to say, “An unexamined life leads to much more difficult living.”

Truly, the price of taking the time to examine my activities and follow up on them is well worth the value I receive in return. It’s when I don’t do my daily tracking and logging and self-assessments, that I get into trouble.

Oh, one last thing — if I have a long series of unfinished tasks and things I messed up, over and over and over again over the course of days and weeks, I pay special attention to that and make a priority of learning about it. Over the extended term, I look at my log pages and I watch for patterns. If I see that I am failing regularly to get certain things done, I explore that and then do research on it. And if I look long and hard enough and am focused enough on it, I can often find info that helps me deal with the issues, and overcome them.

For example, I have a fairly long list of action items I am responsible for following through with at work, but I haven’t been able to start a number of them, for lack of motivation (and difficulty with initiation).  So, I did some research on motivation and initiation problems, and I learned that I may have issues with my cingulate gyrus, so I’m paying more attention to my initiatory abilities and doing some exercises to improve how that part of my brain is engaged.

It can be a bit daunting to do this every single day — and the stack of papers I’ve got showing what all I’ve tracked is a little overwhelming. But unless I track myself and take a look at what I’m doing on a regular basis, I don’t have the chance to do a course correction, and can I end up stuck in a bad groove that just drags me down.

So, I track myself. And it helps.

It might just help you, too.

Daily planning tools to keep on track

It’s no secret I’m really into regularly tracking my activities and progress. I find that the more I track my progress, and the closer tabs I keep on how I’m messing up (and what I can do about it), the better I function and the better I feel about myself.  You can read how I use the system at this post.

I’ve made a new version of the form I fill out each day, for others to use. You can download it here for free: Daily Planning and Results Log Book Blank (Word document format).

Log Book View

Log Book Page 1

Log Book Page 3

Log Book Page 4

This log lets you record what you have planned to do each day at a certain time, as well as what you actually did (I tend to “wander off” and not get things done, so I need to track what I actually did instead, so I can see what motivates me to take action throughout my day). It also has a few pages for “360 feedback” notes, which are all about what you did right during the day and why… as well as what you could have done better, why that was, and what you can do different next time.

It’s based in part on the Give Back materials, which include daily planners as well as head injured moment assessments. But it’s also modified based on what I’ve learned works well for me. Give Back tends to limit the number and kinds of explanations for why things turned out like they did. Their reason lists are also a bit of a jumble with not much organization. Plus, I find that having a whole big form to fill out to explain why I screwed up, causes me to spend more time thinking about stuff, than actually doing it — with me, it leads to “analysis paralysis” — but it might not be that way for everyone. Some people, I’m sure, really benefit from extended examination of their issues.

But I tend to get so busy during my days, that I just don’t have the time for extensive analysis of my head injured moments (even though I tend to have more than a few in the course of each day). I find it most effective to keep things simple and flexible, and focus on how I get through my day… and how I can do  better the next time, if I need to refine my approaches.

I’m also creating a version of this log that is book-length and spiral bound. It’s very simple and straightforward — just a bound copy of about a month’s worth of forms, to make it easier to keep organized. I’m presently creating it on Lulu.com and it will be available shortly for folks who want to buy a copy of the book that collects everything in one place.

I tend to keep all my forms clipped together in a stack, which isn’t the neatest way to do things. But that’s just me. I will probably order my own spiral bound copy, in any case, because the printing is going to be nicer than my own printer, and it won’t smear when I mark it all up with my highlighters. Also, having it all in one place — what a concept!

Just so you know, there the book-length workbook will cost money to buy. But there’s no obligation to purchase anything. Honestly, we pay enough as head injury survivors, in terms of daily difficulties. Why add to the burden? The  book-length version is just a neater and more orderly print alternative to the 4-page version (which is a free download).

For the download, you can grab the Word document and then print it out and fill it in by hand or you can put it on your computer and type in the information. Either way — whatever works best for you. I tend to handwrite all my notes, because I’m not always at a computer, and I don’t want my recovery to be dependent on technology. Plus, I like to color-code my info, so it’s easier to decipher later (that’s sometimes a challenge).

Oh, if you don’t have Microsoft Word on your computer, you can download a copy of OpenOffice (www.openoffice.org) for free — it has all the applications you find in MS Office — word, powerpoint, spreadsheet, even database. But it’s Free. As in — costs you no money at all.

Me? I’m big into free. So, if you want to use this log, and you need a word processing program that rocks, check out Open Office.

Well, must run – the day is waiting.

%d bloggers like this: