Change. It’s up to me. It’s what I do.

Yes, it does

So, it’s a beautiful day. Unfortunately, I only got about 6 hours of sleep last night. I stayed up too late and woke up too early. I’ll remedy that later with a long nap. That’s the plan, anyway.

I’ve got a call in a little bit with a Feuerstein Method practitioner, who helps people rewire their brains with specific combinations of exercises, along with a highly interactive approach. They live relatively close to me. Same part of the state. So maybe I can meet with them.

I’ve been reading up on the Feuerstein Method, and it’s very much in agreement with what I believe about the human brain, the human system, and all the latent abilities we have — just waiting for us to bring them forth. A great in-depth overview of the method’s main assessment “device” can be read here: http://acd.icelp.info/workshops/theoretical-material/lpad.aspx. It’s a lot to take in and digest, but the bottom line is, it’s a system that is based on a “belief system that holds individuals to be modifiable, as well as amenable to registering and detecting adaptive changes.

And that works for me.

Basically, the bottom line is that the human system is built for change, and the Feuerstein Method harnesses that, and then directs it by 1) understanding how a person learns, as well as the degree to which they are able to adapt, and 2) using a highly interactive “mediation” approach between the helper and the person who’s seeking help. It’s mutually interactive approach which makes all the sense in the world to me.

And I wish I’d found it sooner. Something keeps nagging at me about my recovery not progressing as quickly as it could have. I firmly believe the human brain can change dramatically, if it gets the right kind of help. And I haven’t really been getting as much direct help as I would like. My sessions with my neuropsych have been useful in terms of being professionally productive. But there are many other areas where they just cannot fathom the difficulties I’m having… let alone take action to address them. They’re just not that kind of neuropsychologist.

But I guess I had to bump up against the upper limits of my ongoing TBI rehab, in order to get to this point. I’ve pushed the limits of what’s possible in a conventional neuropsychological context, and I’ve wrung more out of that, than I think was ever expected of me. I’ve had phenomenal progress, over the past years, which has benefited me more than words can say.

I’ve also really experienced a great deal of frustration in the process, but that’s not all bad. First, it’s forced me to think critically and come up with my own ideas and approaches about things, where the ones offered me were not working. Second, it’s really anchored a deep compassion in me for others in similar straits. I think I’ve got more empathy for others, now, and I have a better understanding of the difficulties others may face on a regular basis. So, it has been quite useful for me to work with a neuropsych.

On top of that, I’ve been able to have a positive effect on them, so that’s good.

And in the end, it’s taught me to be a lot less trusting, across the board, of “experts” who claim to to have the market cornered on a specific discipline. I tend to be naive and trusting of folks in positions of authority — especially the folks I like and get along with. But they’re as human and as flawed as the next person, so…

Anyway, it’s all connected and everything has its place.

Next…

What’s next?

  1. Getting a better, more in-depth understanding of my deficits — and yes, they are deficits, not just differences or challenges. There are real ways I need to improve, in order to perform at my best and have a high quality of life.
  2. Identifying where those deficits are holding me back, and where fixing them will help me. This is central to recovery, because I have to understand the context and the meaning of my work, in order to stay motivated.
  3. Working on my exercises again. I have gotten away from doing exercises, and I am getting back to them. I used to do Dual N-Back training and some Brain HQ training, which seemed to help me. But I left that behind — I think when I was starting to get better. I often do that — I make progress up to a certain point, and then I wander off and get caught up in other things.
  4. Making sure I get plenty of rest and I eat right. One of the big things that holds me back, is how tired I get. I think this is why I abandon things I enjoy – I get into them, I work myself into a frenzied state of enthusiasm, and then I wear myself out. When I get tired, I feel bad… so the very things that used to give me joy, now seem to make me feel like crap. It’s a recurring cycle, which I can break, now that I understand it.

The thing I need to understand in all this — and remember over time — is that I tend to progress in “fits and starts” and I don’t always need to push myself as hard as I do. And in other times, I need to really push myself much harder than I feel like. I can generally figure out what my system needs, if my head is “not in the mood”. For some reason, it’s contrary.

But that can be a good thing, because it ensures that I still have my own mind, no matter what the rest of the world says.

If I’m going to see change in my life, it’s going to need to come from me. I look forward to finding someone who can work directly with me in a more proactive way, but no matter what, I’ve got to be the one driving the change.

After all, change is what I do.

[WEB SITE] Brain Injury Book List – BrainLine

brokenbrilliant:

TBI Book list from Brainline

Originally posted on TBI Rehabilitation:

Brain Injury Book ListBrainLine compiled this list of books about brain injury to help people who have been recently diagnosed, their loved ones, and others who want to learn more about TBI. Most are memoirs, some are non-fiction, and some offer tips and strategies on living with brain injury. Our list is only a small sampling of the books out there, but they are ones that our editorial staff has reviewed and that our generous online community has endorsed or mentioned as their favorites.

We hope you enjoy the list — alphabetized by author.

Please share other suggestions you may have in the comments section below.

Happy reading!

Continue —>  Brain Injury Book List.

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When dead-ends work in my favor

Note the two tracks on either side that continue forward

My specific discontent with my neuropsychologist is providing impetus to expand and look in more directions for input and ways to progress. That’s working to my advantage, because it’s easier to move on to the next level, when what used to work… doesn’t anymore.

For work situations and professional interpersonal challenges, they can be very helpful.

But in everyday personal connections and relationship matters, not so much.

In the ways they are helpful to me, they have been indispensable.

And in the ways they are NOT helpful to me, they have also been indispensable. Their limitations are forcing me to branch out and seek additional input and help elsewhere.

Which is good. Because there is a whole new emerging world of “brain hacking” that is too “fringe” for them to consider seriously. They almost can’t consider it, because to do so would compromise their professional reputation and put them at risk for losing everything they have worked so hard to build up. They’re a sitting member of a very important organization, so they have to be conservative and avoid any appearances of quackery.

Anyway, I’m digging into new approaches with literally modifying my brain’s wiring and addressing issues that I’ve had for a long, long time. I’m looking at ways of getting metrics on what fundamental deficits I have — and yes, they are deficits, not just difficulties or differences.

They are deficits, and I’m tired of putting them in terms that make them easier to live with and accept. I am tired of accepting my limitations and just putting up with them. And I may have found a way to actually address them at a fundamental, organic, structural way.

More on the Feuerstein Method later.

For now, it’s time for me to be functional and cut this blog post short. I need to get to work, because I’m ending the day early for an appointment with another counselor I see for family / pain / health issues. This counselor poses a completely different set of challenges for me, and it’s actually good practice for me to critically assess what they tell me and figure out if I agree with them, or not. A lot of times, I don’t, and it really tweaks me. It puts me in a foul mood.

Today I want to do things differently. And so I shall.

Onward.

When getting no help is the best help of all

Well, that was no help at ALL — or was it?

I had a really good session with my neuropsych last night. But not for the reasons you might think. I came away with a renewed sense of really being capable of dealing with things on my own. In terms of having someone to bounce ideas off of, as well as sorting through the professional social landscape, they have been incredibly helpful to me.

I’ve been having a lot of physical/logistical challenges, lately. Vision, balance, headaches… feeling not-quite-here. It’s been pretty distracting, and it’s been adding to the overall burden of my daily life. The job changes and my spouse’s mental/cognitive status have been putting a lot of pressure on me. And I’d like to clear out whatever physiological and logistical issues I can, so that I can free up more energy to deal with the bigger emergent issues in my life.

The issues are good, as well as bad. I have a new job coming up, and I want to be in top shape to step up.This is really important to me — a new chance to really jump-start my life to where it should be, by now. My TBI in 2004 not only took the wind out of my proverbial sails, but also blew directly against me… alternating with stopping completely, so I was stuck in the doldrums.

So, now I have a chance to get back. I’m feeling a little pressure — but even more than that, a huge sense of promise, that I want to live up to, to my fullest.

So, I had gone to my neuropsych appointment with the hope of discussing these issues with them and coming up with some solutions.

However (and I’ve known this for years), they are a particular brand of “mind-only” Buddhist and they believe that we create our worlds with our minds and thoughts, and the difficulties I’m having are just exacerbated (if not created) by my having a skewed understanding of myself, who I am, and how things “should” be in my life/the world. They’re also very much into the idea that we create suffering in our minds, rather than it coming from the outside world. And that’s about the most bizarre distortion of Buddhism I’ve yet to hear. It’s common with American Buddhism, which is a strangely morphed version of “the original” that has people outside the West shaking their heads in bafflement. American’s (and perhaps a lot of Westerners) have their own spin on suffering and its causes, that is unique to them… not to Buddhism.

I’ve been through this kind of exchange with them in the past, and it always leaves me frustrated and exasperated. And it makes me want to fire them. I go to them for help with very real issues that I am reluctant to share (and have difficulty talking about), and all they can tell me is, “Change your perception of your difficulties, and that will relieve your suffering.” Oh My God. I just re-read that, and it sounds so ridiculous. Ludicrous. And it could tweak me into a migraine. But I’m not going there, right now, thank you very much

I’ll resist the impulse, because there’s a valuable lesson coming from this.

It’s a very strange sort of dissonance that takes place in that office, some days.

I have the hardest time actually telling people about my difficulties, and admitting how hard things have been for me. It’s so much easier to just cover it up and suffer in silence. Not always suffer, but just suck it up and deal with it. But there are times when I reach a point where I just can’t hold out anymore, and I need to discuss my concerns with someone — and also come up with a plan of attack.

So I work up the courage to go to their office with the intention of finding solutions to issues I’m having, which have been a huge source of distress to me. And we end up talking about how I perceive these issues that are causing me so much distress… “showing” me how my attitude is actually adding to my discomfort. I could be wrong (and I often am because my judgment gets all turned around and paranoid and narrowed, especially lately), but they seem to be encouraging me to acknowledge things as they are, see the hardships and accept them, and not let them get me down or stop me from just living my regular life.

Oh my God. Some days it is so exasperating. I’m genuinely having issues, and they really seem to think it’s all in my head.

Right.

Should I stay or should I go, now….? (I hear The Clash singing in the background.)

It’s complicated. This individual has helped me tremendously, in terms of getting me back on track with my professional life. That’s where their “sweet spot” is. I don’t have anyone close to me in my life who is actually mainstreamed in the way that I am. My family is very small-town and rural, which is not a bad thing. It’s just very different from my own immediate world. And my family is very religious in ways that are different from my own. With my neuropsych, I have had huge success in sorting out my work life, my relationships on the job, understanding the personalities I’m dealing with, as well as workplace dynamics, and that’s been more valuable than gold to me.

The place where they do NOT help me, is with my logistical issues and all those weird, distracting symptoms and anomalies that keep me on my toes.

Those, I need to sort out in a different way.

Which I shall do. I’ve found a rehabilitative neuro-optometrist near me, and I’m going to make an appointment with them to rule out any vision issues which could be screwing up my balance, as well as messing with my other senses. I just need to rule things out. I hope they take my insurance – I’ve got crazy-good insurance right now that lets me go see any specialist I want, without a referral needed. And I can’t afford a non-insured visit, quite frankly.

I’m also going to follow up with another neurologist about the autonomic testing. And I have a follow-up appointment with the physiatrist in a couple of weeks. I’m going to see if I can move that up — or out — because the appointment coincides with my first week on the job, and I need to clear up my schedule for that.

Plus, I’m really bumping up my commitment to fitness, keeping healthy, and strengthening myself. I’m dealing with the issues with my upper back (my traps are not as strong as they should be, and my upper body needs more strength, while my lower body needs more flexibility to accompany the wider range of activity I’ve been giving it. I no longer sit all day, like I used to, and I’ve been walking/hiking a lot more. So, my legs have to get used to that.

I’m basically taking things into my own hands, health-wise. And I’m investigating new ways to rehabilitate myself.

There’s a world of hurt under the surface of my daily life, and I can’t seem to get help from the “standard set” of people I’ve been looking to. So, I’m branching out and expanding.

And that’s exactly what I’ve been needing to do.

Onward.

How Musicians Earplugs Gave Me My Life Back

brokenbrilliant:

Great tip about earplugs!

Originally posted on Halcyon Thames:

One of the most emotionally debilitating symptoms of my concussion was hyperacusis; or over-sensitivity to noise. What used to sound like a normal conversation now sounded like freight train screaming by on the rails. At first I resorted to foam earplugs to get some relief only to find everything muffled and distorted. They were also very uncomfortable; especially for someone with smaller ears such as myself.

When a social event presented itself, I would decline. I also could no longer tolerate the sound of a crowd at the shopping mall or grocery store.

When company was visiting, I would wear my big on-ear noise-cancelling headphones to filter as much as I could, but it was not enough. Did I mention that my life revolved around music? I could not tolerate music either as it not only challenged my tolerance for sound, it also made my head hurt. This went on for 8 long months.

I…

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A good night’s sleep… and a new direction

zelinsky-eye-info

Eye-opening info on the visual systems and the brain-body connection – click to read this

I had a very taxing day, yesterday. In the midst of telling my manager that I was leaving (and having them freak out, albeit in a professionally muted way), and also trying to get work done, so that I can wrap everything up for folks before I go, I had the constant interruption of people stopping by or sending me messages or emails or whatever, so that they could find out what was up… process… congratulate me… etc.

Everyone has been really great about it. Of course, we’re only in the early stages of grief.

Denial… Anger… Bargaining… Depression… Acceptance.

We’ve only gotten to the first stage (though I know everyone handles loss differently, so the order can be mixed up), and I’m expecting anger, bargaining, and depression to ensue before long.

As long as I’m prepared, that’s the main thing.

The issue is, all the interruptions, all day long, the emotion, the storytelling — getting the sequence of things correct, so that I’m telling a consistent story and don’t sound like I’m lying to people — it’s exhausting. Trying to focus, while people are all worked up and want to talk… good grief, it’s tiring. And by the end of the day, I was wiped.

Which is part of the reason I burned supper… then had a minor meltdown when my spouse started yelling at me… then got all bent out of shape about that signalling the permanent end of my marriage, because I just couldn’t take being yelled at when I’d had such a demanding day…

I felt a nasty migraine coming on, and retreated to my bedroom with the lights off and focused on my breathing and slowing my heart rate, to head the migraine off at the pass. It worked. And my spouse came to find me to talk things through because it made no sense for me to go to bed angry. And then I went downstairs and watched “Happy-ish” which is my new favorite show, because there are so many parallels between the main character and myself.

In the end, we finished the evening on a much more normal, loving note. I got a good night’s sleep and woke up to a glorious day. Glorious! as my elderly aunts used to exclaim, when I was a kid.

I miss those venerable elders. I miss them a lot.

Anyway, while reading The Ghost In My Brain, I found a lot of similarities to the author’s experience and my own — the nausea that sets in when people are talking to you… the balance problems… the fact that driving is actually okay, when you’re not cognitively drained (it’s actually a relief)… preferring blurry eyesight to glasses that make objects sharper, but don’t address the full spectrum of vision issues… and having everything be in slow motion when talking, because there are all sorts of additional processes that need to take place in the background, while you’re working through what someone is saying to you… and then there’s the trouble planning.

The author talks about how he had regular appointments with a Dr. Miller to work through daily logistics with TBI, and he was often not 100% sure he was supposed to be there. I used to do that all the time with my neuropsych, for a number of years. I was pretty sure I was supposed to be there, but I wasn’t 100% confident, so I just went — and if I was supposed to be there, then that was cool. If I turned out to be there on the wrong day, I was prepared to turn around and go home.

Fortunately, we always had appointments on Tuesday afternoons, so it was consistent. If it was Tuesday, then I’d go to their office and wait in the waiting room. Sometimes I would sit in the waiting room for quite some time, if I got there a little late. I wasn’t sure if I should go knock on the door, or if they would come out to find me. Eventually, I got in the habit of knocking on the door — the thing is, I now realize, I would avoid it, because it hurt my ears when I knocked. Driving an hour through evening rush hour traffic really took it out of me, so my hearing was on HIGH. I’d just suck it up, though, and knock. The discomfort of the knocking, though, was actually preferable to the auditory shock of hearing their door open suddenly. It always startled me, because they have one of those noise-dampening brushes across the bottom of their door, and it makes a really loud noise when it opens.

At least, it’s loud for me.

Anyway, all the discomfort aside, I’m considering following up with a neuro-rehabilitative optometrist to see if I actually have vision issues that are making my symptoms worse. After I was hit in the head with the rock when I was 8 (a year earlier I’d fallen down a flight of stairs and temporarily lost the ability to speak), I developed double-vision (diplopia, I think it’s called). I was taken to an eye doctor who prescribed reading glasses, and I’ve worn them ever since.

In recent years, I’ve actually opted for not wearing my glasses whenever I can. It’s more comfortable for me. My glasses help me see things in the distance just fine, but I prefer to do without them. Sometimes I will even drive for short distances without my glasses (if no one is around and the road is empty and runs straight ahead). I have been thinking it’s because I just can’t stand having them on my face… but now I’m wondering if maybe they are actually making it harder for me to see, because they are not allowing my eyes to get the kind of light I need to get.

Reading The Ghost In My Brain, I am finding so many similarities — especially with how vision and balance are so closely connected — that I think it makes sense to follow up with my vision. Just get my eyes checked out for that other aspect. Apparently, there are three ways our eyes help us — regular straight-ahead vision, peripheral vision, and then connections with sleep-wake cycles, balance, hormones, neurotransmitters, posture, etc.

And I wonder if maybe so many of my logistical problems — which I have never been able to articulate well to anyone, because they make no sense to me or anyone else — might have to do with vision issues. From the time I was 8. So, for over 40 years. If this is true, and my visual systems have been impacted, then it makes a lot of sense why I perform so high on visual-spatial tests. I’ve had to develop more abilities to offset the deficits I got from those TBIs. Add to that even more blows to the head, and you’ve got yourself quite a recipe for a very interesting life.

Additionally, I’m looking into the Feuerstein Method, which is a way of “learning to learn” — finding your strengths to offset your weaknesses, and restoring functionality that I really need to have, but which has eluded me.

My neuropsych has been incredibly helpful to me, in terms of helping me sort through all the psychological clutter, helping me retrain my executive function and beefing up my gist reasoning. The thing is, they take that approach, which is psychological, and the physiological aspects fall by the wayside. At least, that’s how it seems to me. And anyway, I do a really poor job of communicating everything that’s going on with me, at times, because I have a long drive to get to them, at the end of usually challenging days, and I’ve been so stressed out over the years with all my old sh*tty jobs, that I haven’t had as much bandwidth as I’d have liked to.

I do a danged good impression of someone who’s got their act together. Because I have to. If I don’t, I can lose my job. I can lose my house. I can lose everything, and my spouse will lose it all, too. So, keeping up the appearance of being on top of everything is my top priority.

Of course, that can backfire, because then you can’t always reveal the areas where you need help, when someone is there to help you.

But anyway, that’s another blog post for another day.

Right now, I’ve got some new lines of inquiry to follow, and that’s super cool. I also have some exercises I can do to help me — Designs for Strong Minds (the site of the rehab person who helped Clark Elliott retrain his brain) has a bunch of exercises at http://www.dsmexercises.com/, and I went ahead and paid the $13.99 for the full suite of exercises. It’s easier and quicker than trying to piece things together for myself. Plus, it’s a deal, because individually, the collections of challenges are $9.99 each.

Even the most basic ones pose some issues for me, although I’ve been scoring 87% or better. A number of my choices have been lucky guesses. I won’t be happy until I can score 100% without doubts. Then I can move on to the next batch. There are exercises for NASA rocket scientists, and other pattern matching things.

And that reminds me about my Dual N-Back training I used to do regularly. I need to try that again. I was doing Dual N-Back training when I was learning to juggle. Now I know how to juggle, and I wonder if my Dual N-Back training is “sticking” as well.

New tests for a new day.

Interspersed with lots of rest.

I’m pretty happy about the progress I’ve made in my life, relative to where I was 10 years ago. Relative to where I believe I could be — and should be — I’m not happy. I know I can do more and I know I can do better. Getting there is the challenge.

And it finding out if I have vision issues that can be fixed, could be an important next step.

Onward!

Sifting through the possibilities

I am bone-tired, right now. I gave notice at my current job, this morning, much to the dismay of my coworkers and manager. It was actually quite touching. I will miss them, in many ways.

I realize that now, which is good. It’s better to have loved and lost, than to have hated the guts of everyone you’ve worked with for 40 hours/week over the past year and a month and a day (which is what today is — a year, a month, and a day, since I started).

Nice symmetry, right?

Still, it’s been exhausting.

And I have another 3-1/2 weeks to go. My major projects are wrapping up, and I’m helping to get some other projects rolling while I’m still around. I’m also going to put the finishing touches on my Most Major project, get it all queued up, and then hand off the plan to folks to follow through.

I’ll need to rest. Get plenty of good sleep in the coming weeks. Study up on the new technologies I’ll be using, find the resources I need, and also get a head start on thinking through some of the undertakings that lie ahead of me.

The beauty part is, the new kind of work I’m going to be doing has a strong learning and research aspect to it. Which is what I love to do, and what I’ve been wanting to transition into, for quite some time. And the truly promising thing about this is that, as a member of a company that is an industry leader, I’ve got immediate credibility in the eyes of others — kind of like having a degree from Harvard or Stanford or MIT or CalTech.

I finally get to do what I’ve wanted to do, all along. And I get paid a heckuva lot more than a research scientist, while doing it.

Win-win-win-win.

Anyway… yeah… rest.

I spent most of the past weekend, reading The Ghost In My Brain, and it’s given me a lot to think about. Just a hugely helpful book for me, where I saw many reflections of my own experiences.

It’s a lot to take in… and I’m happy to be here.